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You can use pretty much any iPod (I use an ancient second generation mini that's more than 10 years old), or you can simply copy your music library to any USB storage stick, and play your music through Ride Command. The appropriate music files will be in .mp3 format.

Here is some helpful information
How to Find an Audio File on the Computer

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...and-save/2924eed9-6aa9-47db-99cd-02362e2d9bae

Windows Basics: Finding Files on Your Computer

There's nothing wrong with Bluetooth, in fact it works quite well. But you'll have two devices to control (Ride Command and the Bluetooth device) compared to one device with either iPod, or a USB storage stick ( I, and others call them a thumb drive). The software to control the iPod is built into Ride Command, as is the software to play .mp3 music files.

If you go the iPod route, you'll download iTunes from www.apple.com, and use that to copy your music files on your computer to your iPod. If you go the USB storage stick route, you'll use Windows, or Mac to copy the music files from your computer.

If you have no music files on your computer to begin with, Then your options are pretty limited: An external Sirius XM radio device, or a smartphone running Pandora, Spotify, Google Music, etc. etc, connected via Bluetooth are pretty much it. The smartphone music is limited to anywhere where you have internet data coverage, and constant use could exceed data limits on some phone plans, costing either a little more per month, or a lot more, depending on your individual plan.
 

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I have a 2018 Sl and use the USB adapter in the glovebox with a thumbdrive. I've loaded over 800 MP3 songs onto the thumbdrive and the radio (Ride Command) plays them perfectly.
 
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BTW, there are plenty of places to down load free MP3, especially for the classic stuff. Pretty much anything made in the 19##s is now available free of charge. That's what I did and I've got all the cool bands! (ACDC, Aerosmith, Van Halen, Bowie, Queen, etc.)
 

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The usb drive input on the ride command will not recognize most larger newer usb thumb drives file systems. Generally. anything over 32gb uses the newer file systems. You can convert larger thumb drives to the FAT32.. I did a 64gb for my SS. A little YouTube or internet browsing will show ya how to do it free.
So, use the older smaller gb thumbdrives if you dont want to mess with file system conversations. Which really was easy.
Usually 16gb and less are all still FAT32. Most 32's on up are not.

WW
 

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I have a 2018 Sl and use the USB adapter in the glovebox with a thumbdrive. I've loaded over 800 MP3 songs onto the thumbdrive and the radio (Ride Command) plays them perfectly.
I've found that the sound quality is much better with my ancient iPod than with the same songs stored on a USB drive, which is why I use it. My best guess is the Wolfson DAC in the iPod works way better than whatever cheap Chinese DAC is built into Ride Command. The difference is really noticeable.
 

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You can use pretty much any iPod (I use an ancient second generation mini that's more than 10 years old), or you can simply copy your music library to any USB storage stick, and play your music through Ride Command. The appropriate music files will be in .mp3 format.

Here is some helpful information
How to Find an Audio File on the Computer

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...and-save/2924eed9-6aa9-47db-99cd-02362e2d9bae

Windows Basics: Finding Files on Your Computer

There's nothing wrong with Bluetooth, in fact it works quite well. But you'll have two devices to control (Ride Command and the Bluetooth device) compared to one device with either iPod, or a USB storage stick ( I, and others call them a thumb drive). The software to control the iPod is built into Ride Command, as is the software to play .mp3 music files.

If you go the iPod route, you'll download iTunes from www.apple.com, and use that to copy your music files on your computer to your iPod. If you go the USB storage stick route, you'll use Windows, or Mac to copy the music files from your computer.

If you have no music files on your computer to begin with, Then your options are pretty I limited: An external Sirius XM radio device, or a smartphone running Pandora, Spotify, Google Music, etc. etc, connected via Bluetooth are pretty much it. The smartphone music is limited to anywhere where you have internet data coverage, and constant use could exceed data limits on some phone plans, costing either a little more per month, or a lot more, depending on your individual plan.
@
You can use pretty much any iPod (I use an ancient second generation mini that's more than 10 years old), or you can simply copy your music library to any USB storage stick, and play your music through Ride Command. The appropriate music files will be in .mp3 format.

Here is some helpful information
How to Find an Audio File on the Computer

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...and-save/2924eed9-6aa9-47db-99cd-02362e2d9bae

Windows Basics: Finding Files on Your Computer

There's nothing wrong with Bluetooth, in fact it works quite well. But you'll have two devices to control (Ride Command and the Bluetooth device) compared to one device with either iPod, or a USB storage stick ( I, and others call them a thumb drive). The software to control the iPod is built into Ride Command, as is the software to play .mp3 music files.

If you go the iPod route, you'll download iTunes from www.apple.com, and use that to copy your music files on your computer to your iPod. If you go the USB storage stick route, you'll use Windows, or Mac to copy the music files from your computer.

If you have no music files on your computer to begin with, Then your options are pretty limited: An external Sirius XM radio device, or a smartphone running Pandora, Spotify, Google Music, etc. etc, connected via Bluetooth are pretty much it. The smartphone music is limited to anywhere where you have internet data coverage, and constant use could exceed data limits on some phone plans, costing either a little more per month, or a lot more, depending on your individual plan.
 
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