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There have been many comments on the forum regarding driving this beast in cold weather. How about the other end of the spectrum? How is the ride in the SS in the heat? My current bike is my daily commuter as long as the weather is decent. By decent, I mean no rain or ice when I leave for work and no forecasted rain or ice for the ride home. Here in north Texas, that means I'm riding in anything from below freezing temperatures to the mid low-100's. I will draw the line at a forecasted high temperature of around 105. I always ride with motorcycle boots, motorcycle jacket, and FF helmet. I've had plenty of experience riding in the heat. In the evenings, my commute can take up to an hour. Plus, there are the long rides-to-eat and summer trips. So, for the owners in the warmer areas, what's your take so far as how the SS will be for long rides in the heat? Do you think it's suitable for a couple hour ride in the sun with temps well above 90 F and into the low 100s? I know I won't need any of my current motorcycle garb other than my helmet, so that will obviously help inside the cockpit. I'd appreciate hearing what you're riding experiences have been like in the warmer parts of the country. How is the airflow in the cockpit? Who's had the warmest ride so far?


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You will get a lot more data on this subject come July or August when we all find out how hot this cockpit is going to be......... I'm sure you will be seeing all sorts of posts on this topic then
 

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I'm in a similar temp situation here in Florida. Hot summer days and sun beating down on you makes it tough during red light stops. Good thing is this has cup holders and room for a small cooler to keep your drinks in. I would say the airflow is enough to keep you comfortable on the warm/hot days. One thing you will notice vs a conventional bike or trike is with having a full seat (back) you will find you'll end up being more (how can we nicely say wet) on your back than riding a bike. No airflow behind you will be the only major drawback but that would happen with any vehicle with seats designed like this.
 

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I've driven in 90 degrees here in Miami. I melt at stops. I stopped wearing my helmet when it's that hot. I do not like wearing a ton of sun block either so I got these white Balaclavas. I also wear White long sleeve t shirts and gloves.

 

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This is probably my biggest dissatisfaction with the SS. I have put on 300 miles in the last couple of days and I am shocked to how warm it gets in the cabin; especially the passenger footwell, glovebox, and cup holders.

At low 80 degrees I was warm. Im not sure how it is going to be when are temps are 90 ~ 115, which is 9 months of the year.

The vehicle is fun, but I will have to try to address this with exhaust, heat shield, and maybe something additional on the firewall.

For people driving at 70 degrees and less, it is wonderful that it puts out some heat.
 
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Can't be any warmer than a faired sport touring bike with a 1000+cc motor between your legs. Heat shield products are relatively cheap and easy to install. I have had to shield my airbox, tank, fairing, and seat on just about every bike I own so adding to the Slingshots minimal shielding should be a quick and easy fix. I already ordered the manifold shield and have quite a bit of stick on insulation on hand. With the muffler location I figured this would all be a necessity from day one.

http://www.heatshieldproducts.com/automotive/heat-shield-and-thermal-barriers

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Many of the reports coming in seem to confirm that a heater is not really necessary on the SS. Must be why so many are loving it in the colder climates.
 

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This is probably my biggest dissatisfaction with the SS. I have put on 300 miles in the last couple of days and I am shocked to how warm it gets in the cabin; especially the passenger footwell, glovebox, and cup holders.

At low 80 degrees I was warm. Im not sure how it is going to be when are temps are 90 ~ 115, which is 9 months of the year.

The vehicle is fun, but I will have to try to address this with exhaust, heat shield, and maybe something additional on the firewall.

For people driving at 70 degrees and less, it is wonderful that it puts out some heat.
Interesting! Florida has a lot of warm weather but I'm uncomfortable riding open air vehicles when it's anything less than 62 (or over 90) I'm thinking of putting a hole in the firewall with a removable cover just behind the muffler. Maybe even some duct work to route some heat to driver side if needed. If I lived further north I'd do it as soon as I got it home.
 

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Can't be any warmer than a faired sport touring bike with a 1000+cc motor between your legs. Heat shield products are relatively cheap and easy to install. I have had to shield my airbox, tank, fairing, and seat on just about every bike I own so adding to the Slingshots minimal shielding should be a quick and easy fix. I already ordered the manifold shield and have quite a bit of stick on insulation on hand. With the muffler location I figured this would all be a necessity from day one.

http://www.heatshieldproducts.com/automotive/heat-shield-and-thermal-barriers

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I respectfully disagree. I have riden many different bikes and still have a 600rr with no heat shields and exhaust that runs under the seat. The SS is warmer than all other bikes i've riden.

This sounds weird, but i'd compare it to a front engine lawn mower. A lot of heat come right back to you, but there isnt enough wind to blow it away effectively.

Put a bottle of cold water right from the fridge in the cup holder and 10 min later it was warm enough to make luke warm coffee. Awesome deal if you like keeping your warm drinks there.

I havent used a helmet yet, so im referring to the warmth in the mid body and legs.

With all that said, I still love the SS. Just concerned about having to park it for 3~4 months in the summer. Looking forward to seeing how people shield this heat from cockpit.

Ill ride sometime soon and take some pics with my digital laser temp gun.
 

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Hi everyone I will be taking my ss to Arizona in five years.living here in New Jersey I had to do quite a bit of heat shielding to my wife's can am rt 2013. Wrapping the header pipe, and a couple of square feet of radiant heat deflectors has made a considerable difference in the temperature of the plastic in the troubled areas.basically she reported almost intolerable too quite acceptable in low-speed and local conditions.

there is no doubt in my mind that the entire firewall will have to be covered all the way to the Bell of the transmission, and probably double at the garbage can size muffler. I will consider myself lucky if I can achieve 25 -30% reduction in transferred heat to the driving cabin. But if you cover it all without hindering airflow there will be a decent improvement.

Why do we continue to disassemble our new machines before the first oil change?

Engineers design machines, technicians finally make them work properly.
 

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You will get a lot more data on this subject come July or August when we all find out how hot this cockpit is going to be......... I'm sure you will be seeing all sorts of posts on this topic then
I agree with you, I am so certain of this I will start my modifications in December or early January when my ss arrives. Some will immediately go to paint and looks, I will have to go to minor design updating, primarily in heating,cooling and lubrication.
 

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Don't have one yet but it sounds a lot like what happens with the Triumph Spitfires. Driving position, engine location, exhaust location and even the tilting hood are very similar. I had a huge amount of heat entering the cabin during the summer when I first got it back on the road after it's restoration. Heat shields, sound deadening, seals, and even "heaven forbid" carpet all played a big part in redirecting the heat. Interesting that Polaris has not addressed it?
 

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@ CJFink, it will be a major issue in TX during the summer months. There is a lot of engine heat coming into the cockpit. Heat is always a problem in TX anyways, IJS.

I'm very close to you by the way, Colleyville, TX. If you'd like to come by I'd be more than happy to take ya for a spin! PM me if interested.
 

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Don't have one yet but it sounds a lot like what happens with the Triumph Spitfires. Driving position, engine location, exhaust location and even the tilting hood are very similar. I had a huge amount of heat entering the cabin during the summer when I first got it back on the road after it's restoration. Heat shields, sound deadening, seals, and even "heaven forbid" carpet all played a big part in redirecting the heat. Interesting that Polaris has not addressed it?
Duck with-a-hernia, All these Lotus guys going on endlessly on this forum. Good to see a Triumph guy. I had a last of the series '81 TR 8. Bought new. Loved it. White with a navy convertible top and interior. Bosch F.I. Great car. Never drove it in rain. Pristine when I sold it and only ~ 7400 miles on the clock. British Leyland was worked over by their labor force and forced to shut down. A shame as it put a heck of a lot of wrenches and Lucas Prince of Darkness electronic pros out of work.
 
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