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Finally, an explanation. It makes sense now. Thanks.
Now that that issue has been settled, maybe we might like to move on to discussing the second part of the original question and that is about tires? Just to share our experiences so far, we have found that the BF Goodrich g-Force™ COMP-2™ A/S tires, that we replaced our OE Kenda tires with, provided superior traction on wet roads. Though since we have gone to Yokohama YK740 GTX tires on the front, which provide equivalent, if not better, traction yet, but as an added bonus, also provide a softer, more comfortable ride, (especially noticeable with OE shocks), along with being quieter due to their producing less road noise. Unfortunately they do not manufacture the GTX tire in the 255/35 R20 for the rear so when that time comes, (which will be rather soon now), we will have to decide to go to a different size tire, or to a different designation. Or, we just may remain with the BF Goodrich COMP-2, which does have the more ascetically appealing symmetrical tread pattern.

Bill
 

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Just want to make sure I put it out there to save someone else from a major catastrophe. I personally have driven my SS on highway conditions in the rain many times w/o issues. with that said that is until water was enough for minimal hydroplaning. I had traction control off when rain started with no issues of sliding or hydroplaning. Decided to turn traction control back on and within a couple hundred yards the rear locked up twice making very subtle but noticeable skid and rear then went under a underpass that was dry came out I have the underpass to wet surface and traction control went haywire locking up rear tire first then Front left didn’t matter after that point after it locks up in the rain hydroplaning your just along for the ride. Everything I did to counter continued to cause skating because of traction control putting brakes to one or more of the tires. So words of experience If driving in rainy conditions Turn off your traction control if you want to keep control.
Had my traction control in the rain with brand new tires all around and attached is a picture of the results
 

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Sad! :(

I consider myself very fortunate that though our SlingShot did a lot of sashaying, it stayed on the road. My ego tries to tell me that my experience as I was growing up driving ice and snow helped, my common sense says maybe not so much.

Bill
 
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In a similar discussion at a Facebook group, I was approached by a fellow who'd offered he'd been involved with Slingshot ESC development in the newer model. He didn't agree that disabling ESC in the rain is a good idea, although I provided what I felt was a pretty detailed explanation of how it can take things hinky. I suppose I can't blame him for taking the company line; publicly admitting there's a possible accident-enhancer in the machine would likely be career suicide.

@wjfyfe, thank you for providing that reprint. I though I had seen it somewhere, but at the time of my interaction with the fellow, I didn't recall where.

I'd like to emphasize that I am not dogging the fellow, he seemed capable and it was a composed discussion. All the same, I suspect he may be unaware of this page from the manual.
 
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For the general good, I'd like to offer that ESC and traction control, while intertwined, are not the same behaviors, and as such can be selectively disabled.

The first bump of the switch disables traction control, which is mostly about the engine computer reducing power so as to restrain wheelspin. This illuminates a lamp on the instrument panel as a reminder.

Holding the switch down for five seconds then also disables ESC, illuminating another instrument lamp.Traction control remains disabled, but now also disabled is the ESC. ESC differs from traction control in that it actually pulses the brakes on wheel(s) which are traveling faster than the others. Its primary function is to help prevent loss of control in sudden, collision-avoidance type maneuvers. Studies show that since the introduction of ESC, traffic fatalities have been reduced by 6%, certainly a fair contribution. However, bear in mind that this statistic is drawn from cars which are inherently more stable than Slingshot where ESC is concerned. Slingshot's dynamics are massively different, especially when significant loss of traction occurs on both front wheels simultaneously. A car still has a full rear axle to stabilize it at that point. Slingshot, on the other hand, has a single point of contact at the rear which becomes an instant pivot point when both front wheels have lost traction.

Anyone who's ever experienced it knows what I mean. It's not like a rear skid; it is an instantaneous pivot which occurs with zero steering input, and it moves ever faster as the front end begins to slide to one side. What makes it a particular pucker is that while it's happening,the machine will not react at all to your attempts to correct. You have no steering at that point. None. ESC can exacerbate the conditions which lead to this sudden and practically complete loss of control.

Lastly, regardless of mode chosen, ABS is always active. As it can only remove braking forces as a wheel begins to lock, not add force like ESC, it's not potentially troubling in any condition.
 

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For the general good, I'd like to offer that ESC and traction control, while intertwined, are not the same behaviors, and as such can be selectively disabled.

The first bump of the switch disables traction control, which is mostly about the engine computer reducing power so as to restrain wheelspin. This illiminates a lamp on the instrument panel as a reminder.

Holding the switch down for five seconds then also disables ESC, illuminating another instrument lamp.Traction control remains disabled, but now also disabled is the ESC. ESC differs from traction control in that it actually pulses the brakes on wheel(s) which are traveling faster than the others. Its primary function is to help prevent loss of control in sudden, collision-avoidance type maneuvers. Studies show that since the introduction of ESC, traffic fatalities have been reduced by 6%, certainly a fair contribution. However, bear in mind that this statistic is drawn from cars which are inherently more stable than Slingshot where ESC is concerned. Slingshot's dynamics are massively different, especially when significant loss of traction occurs on both front wheels simultaneously. A car still has a full rear axle to stabilize it at that point. Slingshot, on the other hand, has a single point of contact at the rear which becomes an instant pivot point when both front wheels have lost traction.

Anyone who's ever experienced it knows what I mean. It's not like a rear skid; it is an instantaneous pivot which occurs with zero steering input, and it moves ever faster as the front end begins to slide to one side. What makes it a particular pucker is that while it's happening,the machine will not react at all to your attempts to correct. You have no steering at that point. None. ESC can exacerbate the conditions which lead to this sudden and practically complete loss of control.

Lastly, regardless of mode chosen, ABS is always active. As it can only remove braking forces as a wheel begins to lock, not add force like ESC, it's not potentially troubling in any condition.
I know it's a good idea to disable traction control in heavy rain; is it also a good idea to disable ESC? Thanks for the info
 
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I know it's a good idea to disable traction control in heavy rain; is it also a good idea to disable ESC? Thanks for the info
You're welcome. Yes, ESC can work against us in the rain.
 

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For the general good, I'd like to offer that ESC and traction control, while intertwined, are not the same behaviors, and as such can be selectively disabled.

The first bump of the switch disables traction control, which is mostly about the engine computer reducing power so as to restrain wheelspin. This illiminates a lamp on the instrument panel as a reminder.

Holding the switch down for five seconds then also disables ESC, illuminating another instrument lamp.Traction control remains disabled, but now also disabled is the ESC. ESC differs from traction control in that it actually pulses the brakes on wheel(s) which are traveling faster than the others. Its primary function is to help prevent loss of control in sudden, collision-avoidance type maneuvers. Studies show that since the introduction of ESC, traffic fatalities have been reduced by 6%, certainly a fair contribution. However, bear in mind that this statistic is drawn from cars which are inherently more stable than Slingshot where ESC is concerned. Slingshot's dynamics are massively different, especially when significant loss of traction occurs on both front wheels simultaneously. A car still has a full rear axle to stabilize it at that point. Slingshot, on the other hand, has a single point of contact at the rear which becomes an instant pivot point when both front wheels have lost traction.

Anyone who's ever experienced it knows what I mean. It's not like a rear skid; it is an instantaneous pivot which occurs with zero steering input, and it moves ever faster as the front end begins to slide to one side. What makes it a particular pucker is that while it's happening,the machine will not react at all to your attempts to correct. You have no steering at that point. None. ESC can exacerbate the conditions which lead to this sudden and practically complete loss of control.

Lastly, regardless of mode chosen, ABS is always active. As it can only remove braking forces as a wheel begins to lock, not add force like ESC, it's not potentially troubling in any condition.
I just hydroplaned on mine, and felt this. Totaled it and rolled it.
 
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I just hydroplaned on mine, and felt this. Totaled it and rolled it.
That's heartbreaking, but hopefully you weren't injured.
 
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