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Discussion Starter #1
There's risk in driving a car, riding a motorcycle, walking on the sidewalk, etc. etc. I've never been a motorcycle rider because of my risk threshold, but I'm eager to take on the Slingshot. I'm considering the Slingshot to be safer for me.

On a scale from 1 to 10 where 1 is the risk associated with driving a car and 10 is the risk associated with riding a motorcycle, where to you see the Slingshot? This is the inherent risk of driving the vehicle normally -- don't add risk for racing, etc.

Here are some of my thoughts:

* A motorcycle may lay down... Slingshot is stable.

* You can get thrown from a motorcycle... Slingshot has seat belts.

* Evasive action (hard braking / steering) creates control issues for motorcycle... less so for Slingshot.

* Motorcycle rider is highly exposed in a collision... this is where I see Slingshot's danger zone -- occupants are relatively unprotected in a collision (protective gear aside in both examples).

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
 

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I have been riding motorcycles for 35 years. Yes, they are unsafe. That said, I am VERY careful and have had only one incident that I did not directly deserve (IE doing burn outs, going just too fast, being stooooopid). That incident was hitting a dog at night.

Yes, the Slingshot IS safer than a motorcycle. On your scale, if a motorcycle is a 10, then I put a Slingshot at a 6/7. You are not likely to walk away from a collision with a Ford F350 Super Duty without some kind of injury, but then neither is the idiot in the Smart car.

It is easily as safe or safer than some of the street rods I have owned.

It is safer in that it is inherently more stable than a motorcycle and will allow you to escape from far dumber moves than a motorcycle for the average rider.

If you use caution, be VERY aware of where you are driving and basically act as if you are on a motorcycle and not drive down the road reading a book or otherwise in oblivion, the SS will prove to be an immensely fun driving experience that is overall fairly safe.
 

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I too have aways had a motorcycle for over 35 years and I have always been safe . my number one rule for riding a motorcycle is to ride it like I am invisible. By that I assume that nobody can see me on the road and take precautions all the time. When I am passing vehicles on the road I am always looking at the front tire for any movement of cutting into my lane .in addition I am always careful at intersections always ready for the idiot to make a right turn or a left turn in front of me. on the flip side in my car even if its 30 in the morning and I am the only one on the road I always and I mean always use my blinkers for any lane change because you never know if someone is coming up so fast that I could not see him .it just adds extra safety to me and the rest of the drivers i put it at a 5
 

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yup bigfoot is right on point with that. I might be a little more willing to give it like a 5/10 score instead simply because you are stable, in a seat belt, and the majority of your body is protected from road debris. But obviously everything has its risks and rewards. I have been riding street bikes for only about 3 years now. And I am going to get the slingshot simply because of the stability. And I prefer a steering wheel over handle bars.
 

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The spaceframe goes from up over the steering console and glovebox on the driver's and passenger's sides to the roll bars behind each others' heads. In the unlikely event you do roll, both the spaceframe and the rollbars that can hold up to five times the weight of the vehicle coupled with three-point belts, will keep you safer than a flip on motorcycle might, and, in fact, safer than some convertibles without roll bars will too.

The frame also runs through to the engine bay, which provides some additional protection and stability in a front-end collision, or if a rodent darts in the road, or whathaveyou. If you need to make a very sudden movement, there is no loss of balance to the vehicle.

Additionally, the traction system is pretty comprehensive according to the insights Polaris has offered on the onboard computer safety checks.
If your significant other gives you heck about buying another bike, I certainly think you can say the SS is safer!
 

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This will be way safer than a motorcycle because of not having a balance factor. I have personally seen people tip over at 5-10 mph and suffer severe head injury because of their head hitting the pavement or curb. Another strong reason to wear a helmet.

I am guessing that there will be a lot of people that crash these because of pushing their limits (showing off) or getting ran into by distracted drivers trying to take pictures/video of them. Anyone know the crash rate of T-Rex's in the states? It always has seemed really high....

All I can say, is don't get T-boned in one of these or get rear ended. I can easily see a large car jumping the side of the "cage" or smoking the back and puncturing the gas tank.

I am going to put a bright neon kit on mine for night driving and some sort of taillight flasher possibly that activates with the brake lights.

If you are smart and a little lucky, I am sure most people will not have a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all. My intent is to be as proactive about safety as possible. That includes little driving on freeways -- I'm leary of lane-changers. Fortunately, there are a LOT of great rides around here on winding 2 lane roads. I'm probably not going to go out a lot at night. I'm not a hot-rodder (much). Don't drink and drive. People pulling out in front of me, getting rear-ended, and animals are my biggest concern. Having said that, I've been driving for 40 years and have never been in an accident... never hit an animal... have only had to take evasive measures a couple of times.

The balance factor described by TravAZ is what spooks me about motorcycles. The negative consequence of getting in touch with my inner klutz on a motorcycle is too great.
 

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6.5 for the SS....7.5 if you put a helmet and buckle the belt! The worst danger is a side collision! Remember you make your own security at 95%!
 

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Thanks all. My intent is to be as proactive about safety as possible. That includes little driving on freeways -- I'm leary of lane-changers. Fortunately, there are a LOT of great rides around here on winding 2 lane roads. I'm probably not going to go out a lot at night. I'm not a hot-rodder (much). Don't drink and drive. People pulling out in front of me, getting rear-ended, and animals are my biggest concern. Having said that, I've been driving for 40 years and have never been in an accident... never hit an animal... have only had to take evasive measures a couple of times.

The balance factor described by TravAZ is what spooks me about motorcycles. The negative consequence of getting in touch with my inner klutz on a motorcycle is too great.
I dont know...No offense, but you sound like a worried grandma. You know nothing about riding motorcycles, yes they are more dangerous than a car, but you talk about a "balance factor??"
Bikes are very maneuverable in the right hands. One thing abt a bike is that if you impact something, yes, you will be thrown from the bike and that may be a good thing.
Tell me how it feels to have another car's wheel sitting on your lap after a SS accident. That would worry me. In a collision Im afraid the SS will be rolled over and upon by the other vehicle.
Sorry, protective gear is mostly to protect against abrasion type injuries, you wont get those in a SS unless youre thrown from it and slide. Outside of a helmet, Im not sure any other gear will offer that much protection.
You seem "overly cautious." I dont know you so I say it based on your descriptions, and I dont mean it in a deragatory way but if safety has you so concerned and you want a little open air vehicle, maybe try a used Boxster S? Theyre fun cars.
 

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I'm very interested in the Slingshot. I drive a Dodge Viper and an Arctic Cat Wildcat and grew up on Kawasaki 2 stoke triples H1 and H2 and many dirt bikes back in the day so I am not totally risk averse by any stretch. I'm older now and have some physical limitations that don't let me drive a motorcycle any more.

My concern with the slingshot is the lack of a ROPS like a side by side ATV has. Specifically rolling under and being rear ended by higher vehicles and the new cable median guard rails that are being installed all over now.

Anyone else think this is a concern ?
 

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Life is all about risk vs reward. I known people who have been hit by a car crossing the street, lost a finger jumping out of stopped truck bed, and been impaled by a tree parachuting. Moral to the story is that there's always risk.

With that said, the SS appears to strike a fair balance. It should be safer than a motorcycle as the frame will provide abrasion and low speed crash protection. However, it won't have car features like crumple zones and airbags. Using your scale, I'd say it's a 5.
 

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Ryder said it best, "Life is about risk vs reward." I will live longer if I eat vegan....that aint gonna happen, I like meat, same with alcohol. I have crashed twice on bikes(the first was my fault, the second, I don't remember), still like riding.
The SS will protect us from most flying crap, but what I worry about is the fact that the bumpers on cars are higher than the front of the SS. Still not going to stop me. This thing looks like so much fun.
We have to watch out for the people who insist on texting, putting on makeup, eating, reading and other things instead of paying attention to driving. We can do everything right and someone can still screw up our day.
 

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I rode bikes both street and dirt type, as it was I was riding my dirt bike on a country road and was hit head on. Woke up in the hospital a week later. Guy that hit me said he never seen me. Seems to be peoples excuse. Thing was the guy was in my lane and the %@# judge let him off in the end. Did I let it stop me from riding no. As I got older it did end my riding days. Do I regret riding bikes Hell No. Was some of the funest days of my life.
As for the SS I can't wait to get my hands on one. With all there safety features that Polaris incorporated into them, in my opinion they'll be very safe driving them. I also plan on taking my great grandson on rides with me. My rating is a 5. Another thing everyone should invest in a top quality helmet mine saved my life.
You only live once so why not enjoy life to its fullest. One never knows what could happen any given day.
That's why the wife and I will never stop enjoying life or trying out new things in life such as the SS. Bring it on.
By the way I'm fast approaching 60.
 

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5/10 - It seems most folks are making the SS out to be smaller than it really is. Is it the pictures? Is it the lack of perspective from the videos? Not sure but this is not a small vehicle. The overall length is longer than a Mini Cooper and the height is nearly the same. People have no problem seeing those on the road. While an F350 or my Raptor might climb up on top of an SS pretty easily, they will do so on a Mini or Corvette just as easily.

I think the largest safety factor difference between the SS and a motorcycle is low speed collisions/wrecks. The high speed collisions are pretty much a guaranteed major steps from motorcycle to SS to car/truck. But in low speed stuff the SS should be very much like a regular car - probably up to about 15 mph or so. The frame will absorb impacts, even from the side and guard rails will probably do the same damage to the SS as they would to the aforementioned Mini.

I think the "balance" issue comes into play during evasive maneuvers. For example - a motorcycle coming in way too hot into a corner will almost guarantee a separation of rider and machine but the SS will just go off the road. And I am talking about situations that can't be corrected - either by physics or the abilities of the rider. Catching an SS on a dirt/gravel/grass shoulder will be much easier than on a motorcycle. Hitting wet leaves in a corner can be a life altering proposition on a motorcycle but it will be no issue in the SS.
 

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5/10 - It seems most folks are making the SS out to be smaller than it really is. Is it the pictures? Is it the lack of perspective from the videos? Not sure but this is not a small vehicle.
If anything, I felt really low in the SS... but that's also the point.
 

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Hi. My name is Al. I'm interested in the slingshot, but I have a safety question to anyone that has experience driving one.

Cars have to pass the small overlap test for front end collisions. Obviously this vehicle doesn't conform to auto standards. Nbd.

My question is, How will this vehicle perform when someone crosses the center line and hits you because you cannot move over? With my motorcycle, I can move to the other side of the road to avoid such circumstances. The slingshot takes up the entire lane like a car and I'd be head on with such a collision unless I put the slingshot off the road.

I know all vehicles have their own inherent risks but I wanted to be sure I understand them before I make a purchase, especially since this vehicle is so wide. I have polished a few bumpers with my right leg on my bike, (knock on wood) and I was always able to avoid a head on crash. I only worry that I might trade one danger for another and I want to take that into consideration.


Just curious if anyone has any experience with this and I appreciate your opinions.

Thanks,
Al
 

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A head on collision would be very bad! The Slingshot doesn't have crumple zones or airbags. It is also a fairly light vehicle and low to the ground, which doesn't help it in crash safety.

I for one, don't expect to be well if involved in a head on crash. Luckily they are fairly noticeable on the highway. Get a bright color if safety is very important.
 
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