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Discussion Starter #1
Would like to share this and know if anyone has experienced this issue.

Was driving in the mountains through a lot of curves and hills. Up shifting and downshifting. At one point, while shifting and the clutch depressed, the rpms start to rise. I tapped the accelerator to see if the pedal was stuck. It wasn’t. Rpm’s continue to climb. Too high now to put the bike back in gear This happened so fast. Matter of maybe 2-3 seconds. Only option left was to shut the bike down. By that time the bike was up to 7000 rpms! Past the redline!

Short story: filed a complaint with the NHTSA and sent an email to Polaris who contacted me the next day.

I took the bike to the dealer who thought it was the throttle pedal (this is a wired throttle, not a linkage) but wasn’t sure because he couldn’t duplicate the problem.

The bike is a 2015 with 7600 miles. Polaris said the bike was out of warranty. They are correct. However, I informed Polaris that this was a safety issue and could have been fatal. And if my wife was driving even more so.

They offered to pay for the part only. I said that I wanted Polaris to replace every part that could be associated with this issue at no cost to me. Or I pay for the entire repair myself and see where this goes. It’s not about the money. Again this is a dangerous safety issue.

They refused.

My wife doesn’t even want to be on the bike anymore.

Would like some feedback on this with any similar issues.
 

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What you described sounds like what used to be a problem with the ECU tune and has since been corrected, although there are several things that could cause what you experienced. (The ECU tune resulted in a seemingly random occurrence situation). We also had to shut down the engine, let the ECU reset, then restart the Slingshot.

Several vehicles have recently been found to have similar problems, the Ford F150 comes to mind...

No need to panic about the repair, owners can expect that Polaris is most likely not going to look into this in a manner the average customer is happy with due to the cost in doing so. Not to minimize your wife's experience, you basically have a "concept vehicle," and as such can expect odd sorts of things to happen (or break)--it's just the way it is. (If you were buying a $78,000 concept motorcycle you could expect the same.)

Wet/icy/wet leaves...they all initially exposed shortcomings in the stability control system which were eventually improved, but aren't like on a 4-wheel vehicle. It's just part of owning a crazy-fun vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What you described sounds like what used to be a problem with the ECU tune and has since been corrected, although there are several things that could cause what you experienced. (The ECU tune resulted in a seemingly random occurrence situation). We also had to shut down the engine, let the ECU reset, then restart the Slingshot.

Several vehicles have recently been found to have similar problems, the Ford F150 comes to mind...

No need to panic about the repair, owners can expect that Polaris is most likely not going to look into this in a manner the average customer is happy with due to the cost in doing so. Not to minimize your wife's experience, you basically have a "concept vehicle," and as such can expect odd sorts of things to happen (or break)--it's just the way it is. (If you were buying a $78,000 concept motorcycle you could expect the same.)

Wet/icy/wet leaves...they all initially exposed shortcomings in the stability control system which were eventually improved, but aren't like on a 4-wheel vehicle. It's just part of owning a crazy-fun vehicle.
The dealer said they “think” it’s the throttle pedal not the ECU. So the fact that they are not sure is more concerning.
I understand you say not to worry, but yes there is a reason to worry. As I said in my post if my wife would have been driving this could have been fatal. We wouldn’t even be having this conversation. I wasn’t on a straightaway. Was on series of turns, about 45 mph.

Remember Toyota had a similar situation with a failed ECU resulting in fatalities and lawsuits. So respectfully I don’t take this as a minor issue.
 

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It's a fly-by-wire throttle (electronic signals are sent, there is not a cable that controls something mechanically), so not knowing for sure where the problem lies (until the problem is definitively found) is normal.

I wouldn't "worry" about it either--although a healthy dose of caution is warranted as it is similar to what owners (myself included) faced previously; there were other worse problems, and so far all were addressed by Polaris.
 

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A proper diagnosis should be able to be performed at the dealer. Either the throttle (foot pedal) assembly or the ECU could be at fault. Could have been something related to the throttle body itself. With proper diagnosis it should be able to be fixed. This along with any number of issues could happen to any vehicle, anytime. Obviously it was not good what happened, but before you go calling a lawyer, let the dealer figure out what happened, and why, and work with Polaris to solve the problem. If you still don't feel comfortable driving the vehicle then I would look into selling it.
 
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