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Discussion Starter #1
I have encountered an issue that perhaps somebody can help me solve.

I installed a Rivco hitch on my Sling a couple of years back before a cross country trip, to tow a small trailer. An example of a Sling with the Rivco hitch installed is included.

I went on the trip last year and had no problems. Before our trip this year, I changed out the stock shocks, replacing them with QA1s (height and compression adjustable). The issue, the hitch frame (bottom) hitting the pavement, started up whenever a dip or high point in the road was encountered that was severe enough to cause the hitch frame to impact the road. The same trailer was used on both trips..

Prior to the road trip this year, I made sure that the Sling clearance was set to factory spec (5 inches measured at the frame), plus made sure there was at least five inches between the hitch frame and the road. While troubleshooting this issue, I adjusted the rear shock to raise the height and dialed in more compression. It helped but at times the frame still impacted the road.

I bought the shocks used. The PO stated that they had less than 2000 miles on them. That may be a big factor prompting this issue. The shock may have seen a lot of hard use during those miles. The fact that the stock rear shock held the rear end up enough to prevent the impact from happening tells me that perhaps the compression rate of the stock shock spring is greater than the QA1 currently installed. I have looked all over the QA1 and cannot find any spring info that will help determine what that shock spring is rated at.

My current options appear to be . . . rebuild the QA1 shocks, reinstall the stock rear shock while pursuing a solution, or select another shock (new). This is where some guidance is needed. I have my eye on a set of
DDMWorks 3-way Adjustable Sport Shocks. One of the big selling points for me is the bearing installed between the springs and the spring perch, making adjusting the
s-l640.jpg
height settings much easier. I did not pay that much for the used shocks so it is not a question of cost . . . just a lesson learned that used shocks come with a big set of unknowns.

My question is . . . does anybody use the DDM shocks and can provide me with some comments on them, and if anybody has some thoughts on other solutions, I welcome your input.

Thanks . . . Don
 

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That seems to be a lot of shock travel to hit the bottom of the frame. Have you checked the actual loaded tongue weight of the trailer? If it's too heavy, you'll get exaggerated downforce on a bump.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That seems to be a lot of shock travel to hit the bottom of the frame. Have you checked the actual loaded tongue weight of the trailer? If it's too heavy, you'll get exaggerated downforce on a bump.
Checked it . . . no. I noticed this problem while on the road and did not have a way to accurately check the tongue weight. However, along those lines, I did rearrange the loading of the trailer to put more of the heavier items toward the rear and over the axle of the trailer. Good point however.

Same hitch and trailer that was used last year along with the same stuff we usually take along. We even used Meansling bags for our travel clothes to avoid going into the trailer every night while staying in motels. That reduced some of the weight that we had packed in the trailer last year. That is why I suspect the significant change made that could be the cause of this . . . is the used QA1 shocks.

One thing I am gong to try is, temporarily reinstalling the stock shock and see what happens. Something I just recalled is, after I installed the QA1s I noticed that the back end of the Sling seemed to squat when accelerating. That was not there that I can recall when the stock shock was installed. Adjusting the height and compression on the QA1 shock did minimize that somewhat, but the behavior never really went away. Without the trailer attached, the hitch bottomed out before our trip. That prompted the verification that the clearance height was correct. After the adjustments it did not bottom out. Add the trailer and the problem came back, but some more adjusting of the rear shock minimized the problem but it never went away completely. Tired shocks?? If I keep the QA1s it would be choosing the option to have them rebuilt just to start again with a known good set of shocks.
 

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@dmoxley49 (or anybody else for that matter) If your interested in Daves fantastic new shocks, I did just sell a set to a guy locally here and he has been working the hell out of them and we,ve been watching them closely and just can't say enough good things about them ! Not to mention as the new kid on the block I appreciate any business I get and could probably be talked into a sale price with a p.m.!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@dmoxley49 (or anybody else for that matter) If your interested in Daves fantastic new shocks, I did just sell a set to a guy locally here and he has been working the hell out of them and we,ve been watching them closely and just can't say enough good things about them ! Not to mention as the new kid on the block I appreciate any business I get and could probably be talked into a sale price with a p.m.!
Hello Kev,

Do you what the compression rate is on the DDM shocks? The stock shock on the Slingshot model I have is #360.
 

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@dmoxley49 The DDMWorks 3-way Sport shocks are a twin tube, 3 way adjustable (Compression, rebound and ride height) both compression and rebound have 19 clicks of adjustment, and DDM publishes a very good set of instructions that suggests the initial settings for three different types of driving from a handling fun mountain road setting , to an auto cross setting, and to a drag racing setting.. Its different combinations of both compression and rebound that have to be adjusted to obtain the desired ride your looking for . Perhaps Dave of DDM Works would be able to best advise which setting would work best for highway cruising pulling a trailer, but that could vary with trailer tongue weight. The Beauty of these three way adjustable shocks is that with simple clicks of the adjustable knobs you can experiment and find the ride your looking for. The other beauty of working with the DDM'S is their technical department is undisputably one of the best in the Slingshot industry and always just a phone call away. I will check with Dave but I,m sure he will be able to confirm for us that with the proper compression and corresponding rebound settings the ranges achievable are for superior to the stock shocks in all parameters.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
@dmoxley49 The DDMWorks 3-way Sport shocks are a twin tube, 3 way adjustable (Compression, rebound and ride height) both compression and rebound have 19 clicks of adjustment, and DDM publishes a very good set of instructions that suggests the initial settings for three different types of driving from a handling fun mountain road setting , to an auto cross setting, and to a drag racing setting.. Its different combinations of both compression and rebound that have to be adjusted to obtain the desired ride your looking for . Perhaps Dave of DDM Works would be able to best advise which setting would work best for highway cruising pulling a trailer, but that could vary with trailer tongue weight. The Beauty of these three way adjustable shocks is that with simple clicks of the adjustable knobs you can experiment and find the ride your looking for. The other beauty of working with the DDM'S is their technical department is undisputably one of the best in the Slingshot industry and always just a phone call away. I will check with Dave but I,m sure he will be able to confirm for us that with the proper compression and corresponding rebound settings the ranges achievable are for superior to the stock shocks in all parameters.
What may help you and Dave arrive at a recommended setting is the specifications of the hitch that I am using. It is a Rivco hitch and the specs are . . . a maximum tongue weight of 80 pounds and a maximum tow weight of 800 pounds. Thanks for your help.
 

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@dmoxley49, I have the same Rivco hitch and the directions call for far less tongue weight than you listed for our Slingshots.
Here is section from Rivcos installation instructions....

NOTICE: Maximum recommended trailer gross weight is 550 lbs. and
maximum recommended tongue weight is 60 lbs.

Also I use a hanging scale like this to weigh my tongue before each trip....

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012T9QNA/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The range is too small now for my Slingshot, I used this with the Goldwing and it only had a 35lb. hitch weight limit, but you can get something similar for around $30.00.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@dmoxley49, I have the same Rivco hitch and the directions call for far less tongue weight than you listed for our Slingshots.
Here is section from Rivcos installation instructions....

NOTICE: Maximum recommended trailer gross weight is 550 lbs. and
maximum recommended tongue weight is 60 lbs.

Also I use a hanging scale like this to weigh my tongue before each trip....

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012T9QNA/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The range is too small now for my Slingshot, I used this with the Goldwing and it only had a 35lb. hitch weight limit, but you can get something similar for around $30.00.
Thanks for pointing that out. You are correct regarding the info in the instructions. Also, like the idea of the hanging scale to measure the tongue weight and items going in the trailer.

Thanks again . . . Don
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What may help you and Dave arrive at a recommended setting is the specifications of the hitch that I am using. It is a Rivco hitch a
@dmoxley49 The DDMWorks 3-way Sport shocks are a twin tube, 3 way adjustable (Compression, rebound and ride height) both compression and rebound have 19 clicks of adjustment, and DDM publishes a very good set of instructions that suggests the initial settings for three different types of driving from a handling fun mountain road setting , to an auto cross setting, and to a drag racing setting.. Its different combinations of both compression and rebound that have to be adjusted to obtain the desired ride your looking for . Perhaps Dave of DDM Works would be able to best advise which setting would work best for highway cruising pulling a trailer, but that could vary with trailer tongue weight. The Beauty of these three way adjustable shocks is that with simple clicks of the adjustable knobs you can experiment and find the ride your looking for. The other beauty of working with the DDM'S is their technical department is undisputably one of the best in the Slingshot industry and always just a phone call away. I will check with Dave but I,m sure he will be able to confirm for us that with the proper compression and corresponding rebound settings the ranges achievable are for superior to the stock shocks in all parameters.
What may help you and Dave arrive at a recommended setting is the specifications of the hitch that I am using. It is a Rivco hitch and the specs are . . . a maximum tongue weight of 80 pounds and a maximum tow weight of 800 pounds. Thanks for your help.
Correction, thanks to another member (essixx), the recommended tongue weight is 60 pounds and max tow weight is 550.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@dmoxley49 (or anybody else for that matter) If your interested in Daves fantastic new shocks, I did just sell a set to a guy locally here and he has been working the hell out of them and we,ve been watching them closely and just can't say enough good things about them ! Not to mention as the new kid on the block I appreciate any business I get and could probably be talked into a sale price with a p.m.!
PM sent . . . Don
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I am getting feedback from a vendor (All Things Slingshot) regarding the use of the DDMWorks shocks to help overcome the issue I have when towing. I sent a PM to Dave at DDMWorks about this issue as well, but as yet, have not heard anything back.

More surprising to me, is that I have not received feedback from any owners of this shock. In fairness, I was asking about this shock being used in conjunction with towing, so that may be the reason for the lack of responses. With that in mind, I am open to any and all comments on these shocks. It will help me decide to purchase them or not. There are features that this shock provides that I believe will allow more adjustments when towing than others, so I am leaning toward using them, but more I learn about them the better.

Thanks . . . Don
 

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I have encountered an issue that perhaps somebody can help me solve.

I installed a Rivco hitch on my Sling a couple of years back before a cross country trip, to tow a small trailer. An example of a Sling with the Rivco hitch installed is included.

I went on the trip last year and had no problems. Before our trip this year, I changed out the stock shocks, replacing them with QA1s (height and compression adjustable). The issue, the hitch frame (bottom) hitting the pavement, started up whenever a dip or high point in the road was encountered that was severe enough to cause the hitch frame to impact the road. The same trailer was used on both trips..

Prior to the road trip this year, I made sure that the Sling clearance was set to factory spec (5 inches measured at the frame), plus made sure there was at least five inches between the hitch frame and the road. While troubleshooting this issue, I adjusted the rear shock to raise the height and dialed in more compression. It helped but at times the frame still impacted the road.

I bought the shocks used. The PO stated that they had less than 2000 miles on them. That may be a big factor prompting this issue. The shock may have seen a lot of hard use during those miles. The fact that the stock rear shock held the rear end up enough to prevent the impact from happening tells me that perhaps the compression rate of the stock shock spring is greater than the QA1 currently installed. I have looked all over the QA1 and cannot find any spring info that will help determine what that shock spring is rated at.

My current options appear to be . . . rebuild the QA1 shocks, reinstall the stock rear shock while pursuing a solution, or select another shock (new). This is where some guidance is needed. I have my eye on a set of
DDMWorks 3-way Adjustable Sport Shocks. One of the big selling points for me is the bearing installed between the springs and the spring perch, making adjusting the View attachment 169679 height settings much easier. I did not pay that much for the used shocks so it is not a question of cost . . . just a lesson learned that used shocks come with a big set of unknowns.

My question is . . . does anybody use the DDM shocks and can provide me with some comments on them, and if anybody has some thoughts on other solutions, I welcome your input.

Thanks . . . Don
Hey Dan,
I have the Rivco hitch and QA1 shocks and I have no problem at all I'm also running an 18" rear tire I towed a popup camp trailer but now just a trailer something like yours
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hey Dan,
I have the Rivco hitch and QA1 shocks and I have no problem at all I'm also running an 18" rear tire I towed a popup camp trailer but now just a trailer something like yours
That is good info. On your rear QA1, how many clicks do you have set in on the adjustment when towing? And, if you don't mind, what height do you have between the frame and the ground at the rear location (only if it is handy . . . I am not asking you to crawl under your Sling).

For comparison, my rear shock is set at twelve clicks and the frame/bottom of the hitch is about 5.5 inches off the ground. I had to crank in that much compression adjustment to minimize the hitch hitting the pavement, but it still happened, at least once more. The height changes a little when the trailer is connected. Again, my shocks are used, so they may be ready for a rebuild or belong in the round file.

Thanks for the reply. The more info the better.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A remedy has been has been found to stop the Rivco hitch from hitting the ground.

First, I would like to give credit to Cobra for taking the time to provide some very good advise, help in troubleshooting the problem, finding a cause and finally offering a solution.

It turns out that he has the same configuration on his Slingshot (Rivco hitch & QA1 shocks) and has not had the same issue that I have encountered. He suspected that the spring on the rear shock was not correct. He was/is right. His shock has a 350# spring installed, and mine has a 150#. The shock itself is the same with the exception of the mine having only a compression adjustment (in addition to height). Otherwise, the same shock.body. Once the cause was found, the parts needed were ordered through Summit Racing Equipment. After they arrive and are installed, I will test the new configuration then post the results.

While both of us were surprised that such a lightly rated spring was installed in the rear shock, there is no explanation on why. The shocks were bought used, so there is no history of why the shocks were configured that way.

I have learned more about the QA1 shocks during this process. Enough to know that next time, I will look further into the configurations before purchasing another set. Summit Racing as it turns out, has all the components required to assemble all the combinations of the QA1 line. Could not have been easier.

Thanks again Cobra!
 

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Is it possible that the springs were removed from the front and rear shocks, and a front spring got placed on the rear shock? If it were me, I'd check the front shocks to see if the springs are the same left to right.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Is it possible that the springs were removed from the front and rear shocks, and a front spring got placed on the rear shock? If it were me, I'd check the front shocks to see if the springs are the same left to right.
Anything is possible since they are used shocks. However, if they were swapped then one side in front would have been rated at 150# and the other at 170# based on what I found. You have brought up a good point, and makes me wonder if the other side on the front matches what I found so far. It should be 170# as well.

Once the new parts arrive, there will be a 350# spring on the rear and two 200# springs on the front. I elected to change them all to match the success that Cobra had with his Slingshot while towing.

The lesson learned for me . . . ask before buying and do more research on what works. I have found that when looking at new shocks sets online, the springs rates are generally not part of the descriptions. On one site, Bilstein was the exception, clearly stating what the spring rates are. Makes me wonder where the previous owner obtained the shocks I bought from him and why they set up that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I have one more shock in the front to replace, however, I now know that the changeover to the heavier rated shocks has made a world of difference in the rear of the Sling. I expect the front end to respond better as well.

For those who are curious, I ended adjusting the rear shock to 8 exposed threads (from the bottom of threaded portion of the shock to the bottom of the adjusting collar). On the front 14 threads are exposed. The put the rear of the Sling at 5.5 inches of clearance and the front at 5. I'll see if that changes (at the rear) once I load up the trailer and connect it.

Also, I highly recommend installing the shock bearing set. I makes adjusting the shock height much easier.

Lastly, I can't thank those enough who provided input to this conversation, helping me come to a solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
A brief update . . .

I found that 14 threads was not enough to raise the chassis 5 inches off the ground. Once the suspension settled back down, I found that issue. The 14 threads were about 2 inches between the bottom of the shock/threads and the bottom of the adjusting collar. I added one inch to the adjustment and that raised the chassis to about 5.5 inches. I have decided to leave the adjustment alone and put more miles on it then check again.
 
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