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I have to laugh every time I hear this comparison.

I know it seems like it should be a good fight: both 3 wheels, abs, traction control, power to weight. Mass production, etc.

But they are just too apples to oranges. The Slingshot is literally a car with 3 wheels. The Spyder is literally a Motorcycle with 3 wheels.
 

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I would say its somewhat comparable, but it is more a 3 wheeled car and not a 3 wheeled motorcycle. Plus Polaris woops Cantam already. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yup.. I think it's going to boil down to price though. If they are similar in pricing I think many will compare the two machines all of the time.

1. Both will require a motorcycle license.
2. Can-am and Polaris off-road products get compared all of the time.
3. Both will give you a similar open road, wind in your face type experience.
4. Price?
5. Riding vs Driving.

Can-am has done very well with the spyder over the past few years. It has certainly filled a void missing in the powersports industry. I've considered getting one a few times as I figured it would be the perfect bike to load up in the toy hauler when traveling to places that don't allow off-road vehicles.

The next big question is... How soon will Can-am recognize the success of the Slingshot and release a competing 3 wheel roadster?
 

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Let's all be truthful here. The Can-Am is not competition, in the sense of Aesthetics, performance, or ergonomics in any way... It's as Tango said... Apples and Oranges...

The Slingshot competes more directly with a very low, low end Ariel Atom in the sense of minimalism, and American drive-train. In this regard, let's hope for the best case price war with a CantAm possible.
 

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You could've had a V8
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Yup.. I think it's going to boil down to price though. If they are similar in pricing I think many will compare the two machines all of the time.

1. Both will require a motorcycle license.
2. Can-am and Polaris off-road products get compared all of the time.
3. Both will give you a similar open road, wind in your face type experience.
4. Price?
5. Riding vs Driving.

Can-am has done very well with the spyder over the past few years. It has certainly filled a void missing in the powersports industry. I've considered getting one a few times as I figured it would be the perfect bike to load up in the toy hauler when traveling to places that don't allow off-road vehicles.

The next big question is... How soon will Can-am recognize the success of the Slingshot and release a competing 3 wheel roadster?
This is a pretty good argument. I think price will be the deciding factor if they are even cross shopped.

However, I just think they are so dissimilar that it would be like folks cross shopping a GT500 and a BMW 5 Series convertible. Sure they are the same price but scratch very different itches. I didn't even think of a BMW when I bought my Shelby.

The Can Am provides a motorcycle "experience" with a little more safety, a little more stability, and a little less performance.

The Slingshot provides a car "experience" with a little less safety, a little less stability, and a little more performance.

I too hope that the Slingshot is wildly successful and Can Am answers.
 

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Man, this thing is the product of years worth of research and development. Do you think CanAm or any other company can answer quickly and safely?

I'm asking because I remember when the first iPhone came out back in WW2, and Blackberry lost me FOREVER because they tricked me into buying their POS Storm... Didn't work out so well.
 

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You could've had a V8
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Man, this thing is the product of years worth of research and development. Do you think CanAm or any other company can answer quickly and safely?

I'm asking because I remember when the first iPhone came out back in WW2, and Blackberry lost me FOREVER because they tricked me into buying their POS Storm... Didn't work out so well.
Yes, considering the Slingshot has been in development for at least 4 years, it will be hard for anyone to jump into the game quickly.

Having said that, Can Am does have the spyder under it's belt. Stretching everything to include a frame and seats doesn't seem terribly difficult though the powertrain will need some engineering. Plus they have all the parts bin stuff (ABS, ESP, Tracting Control) and suppliers already.

I would guess two years until they could respond. Thankfully they are not bound by car development issues (crash testing, EPA testing, NHTSA, SAE, etc. etc.) so time to market is much quicker than a car. Hell, they don't even have to post a legitimate power rating!
 

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Polaris has created (or advanced) this niche market in the US. Period.

There is no apples to apples at this point in this [potential] price range.

The Slingshot is a 3-wheeled motorcycle with side-by-side seating.

It's not a Can-Am. It's not a car.

My humble opinion is, it's a waste of time to "compare" the Slingshot to anything. If it makes someone feel better to say to themselves "it has this or that over [insert car/motorcycle]", more power to them. Really, the only thing out there I believe is the T-Rex that is truly a vehicle to compare to the Slingshot. And the price point alone, it's a no-brainer to me on which one.

I just can't wait for the reviews. "It doesn't drive like a Miata." :rolleyes: Well, it shouldn't. It's not a car and does not have 4 wheels.
 

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They may be different in driving/riding style, but why would you even consider a Spyder if you could get a Slingshot for the same money? Honestly, what are the benefits to a Spyder over a Slingshot? I can't think of one.
 

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I am an avid Victory fan and owner of several Victory machines (Vision, Vegas, Crossroads). My wife also owns a Spyder RT-S SE5, unfortunately. I'm going to assume that the Slingshot is a higher quality machine, just because of who makes it. I certainly can't be worse than Can-Am at the least, no one can. That being said, working on that plastic paneled Can-Am pos is an exercise in patience and vocabulary. The simplest maintenance requires extreme disassembly. I hope the Slingshot isn't like that, but when I saw the photo from the rear, with the shock and drive belt sticking through holes in plastic riveted panels, I was crushed. It reminded me so much of looking at the wife's Spyder. But at least the Can-Am seats 2 and has saddlebags, trunk, frunk (trunk in front) for storage. We can pack enough to take multi day trips, which I don't see as an option with the Slingshot. It may not be designed for long trips, but for a machine that will take up that much of my wallet and garage space, it has to be more than a one trick pony.
 

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Since the entire hood tilt forward and up I think you're going to find the Slingshot a lot easier to work on.



There is a huge glovebox in front of the passenger and there are large lockable storage compartments behind both seats. I easily put a medium sized backpack and helmet in one. I also think there will be additional storage solutions available for the Slingshot very soon.
 

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you cannot compare a Can Am to this thing as like a lot of you stated they are not in the same class. this is a rocket on wheels and a Can Am is a turtle going uphill. naturally the Polaris is going to be more expensive, just look at the components this thing has. i would not be suprised to see it in the mid 30's for what this is equipped with but the problem Polaris will have is the same as they have with their Indian motorcycle, lack of dealers. nobody except the rich will buy this machine if they cannot get it serviced close to where they reside. I wish Polaris good luck as they will need it but i would love to take this machine out for a hell of a ride.
 

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Having owned Spyders since 2009, as well as several SxS toys (yes, this is a toy), you sit ON a Spyder, and IN a Slingshot. Think Grizzly vs Rhino or Sportsman vs Rzr.

The Spyder has two HUGE advantages: (1) Tons and tons of storage - you can carry a full bag of groceries in a STOCK low end RS, and three times that in an entry level RT. (2) The semi-auto transmission is killer. See picture for downside:::::

The Slingshot looks kool, but has NO storage - a major drawback. Additionally, the Spyder is really targeted at the Baby Boomers, who still want to ride, but the Slingshot is much harder to get in and out of for that demographic. The Slingshot is priced with the Spyder RS S, and should appeal to the same buyers - but the Spyder's real success revolves around the RT - targeted at the high end two up touring market (aka: Goldwing & K1600), and the current Slingshot won't go there.

Yes, you can toss a suitcase on the passenger seat, but not with a passenger on board..... JMHO

Spyder Fire.jpg
 

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The storage compartments behind each seat and the large glovebox is bigger then you might think. Hopefully we can get actual measurements of those compartments for the site soon.
 

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I think it will and over the next few years I think we'll only see this platform get better and better.
I am an avid Victory fan and owner of several Victory machines (Vision, Vegas, Crossroads). My wife also owns a Spyder RT-S SE5, unfortunately. I'm going to assume that the Slingshot is a higher quality machine, just because of who makes it. I certainly can't be worse than Can-Am at the least, no one can. That being said, working on that plastic paneled Can-Am pos is an exercise in patience and vocabulary. The simplest maintenance requires extreme disassembly. I hope the Slingshot isn't like that, but when I saw the photo from the rear, with the shock and drive belt sticking through holes in plastic riveted panels, I was crushed. It reminded me so much of looking at the wife's Spyder. But at least the Can-Am seats 2 and has saddlebags, trunk, frunk (trunk in front) for storage. We can pack enough to take multi day trips, which I don't see as an option with the Slingshot. It may not be designed for long trips, but for a machine that will take up that much of my wallet and garage space, it has to be more than a one trick pony.
I can shed some light on this topic although I haven't test drove the Slingshot. I can tell you there are many angry Spyder owners out there as BRP and their Spyder dealers have this policy: if you have a complaint or an ongoing problem with a Spyder the dealer can't solve, they hand the problem back to the customer, stating "you have to call BRP (Spyder's mfg in case you didn't know). if you want to get anywhere. BPR in Quebec has a call center for this and the person will be very well trained in giving you empathy, sympathy, or whatever emotional response the situation requires. Then they will open a case number and send you back to contact your dealer like a yo-yo. In my 2 very different experiences here was the end result: NOTHING! The first time they send me a kit, easy to self install, in which every component broke after a fifteen minute ride at 30-45 mph. The only thing that didn't break were iron brackets, but all the plastic component were cracked or shattered. So I went through their process (in my opinion a store that sells you something should be in contact with the mfg, not the customer). Case opened, dealer had their little tete a tete with BRP and BRP told the dealer to tell me it was my fault because I installed the thing wrong. Anyone with a set of screwdrivers with phillips and torque heads could do the install in 15 minutes. BRP offered nothing, not even a discount on a replacement. My dealer ended up selling me the item at cost and this time it worked fine but IMO the plastic parts are cheaply made.

With my second Spyder I learned (after this happened to me) dealers don't disclose a known innate serious fault as this disclosure during the sale would cause most of us to walk out. The check engine sensor is faulty and can cause the check engine screen to go on in warm climates, taking up the full vehicle status screen and distracting the driver as the screen turns bright orange. In the user's manual in the trouble shooting section BRP clearly states "engine management malfunction, remove and reinsert key." An absurd solution if you are in traffic as the recycling process takes 15-20 seconds. Besides, the solution does not work unless you have driven 5-10 miles with the fault condition on your display. I don't have to tell you guys this is a major distraction as our eyes are wired to things that move, change color and status. Rider distraction, as we all know, results in accidents, injuries, and sometimes death, which is why all MSF courses emphasize where your eyes should be. So I go through the usual yo-yo process and had my answer in 2 days. BRP has decided this is a normal operating condition (when even in their own manual they state it is a malfunction) and will not fix it. I went back and forth with my dealer, asked for a refund, less wear and tear for 1,000 miles as this had happened to me at least 10 times in the 3 months I've had this (expletive deleted). My total cost after taxes and everything was $24K. My dealer offered me less that half of that. Bottom line, if you are comparing the Slingshot to the Spyder, they are apples and oranges; however, my dealer tells me every Spyder since 2012 has this issue, yet they go on selling them without informing the customer during the sale. Non disclosure and fraud laws are fairly onerous to the dealers and BRP buy they are banking that no one will bring this to the National Transportation Safety Administration. Well, they hopes are going to be shattered when I contact the feds today. The Spyder is a very good toy, but if you live in a warm climate area I wouldn't consider it as a possible purchase, as this is what causes the malfunction. In the US the NTSA would force a fix and a recall as accidents will most likely be with cars,so (and this is pure speculation, I have no proof or "whistleblower") maybe BRP did what Ford did once upon a time? Is human life (lives) worth the cost of a fix and recall? Ford and other auto manufacturers learned the answer to that question years ago, and it cost them a fortune. This is my last Spyder as I will not deal with unethical business conduct by dealers and manufacturers.

So I hope this sheds some light on the comparison. You have to look deeper than which vehicle I like better. You have to look at who stands behind it. In BRP's case I'm sure they have helped some, but my own personal experience is the opposite. BRP has this customer service mantra "the moment of truth," when there is an opportunity to help a customer. Draw your own conclusions. I agree with the original post when reach stated " I'm going to assume that the Slingshot is a higher quality machine, just because of who makes it. I certainly can't be worse than Can-Am at the least, no one can.
 

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All manufactures have customer service issues. From Cars, Trucks and motorcycles. I can tell you I know several people who will never own Polaris. The big thing is finding the right dealer that takes care of you and deals with the manufacturers. That is the problem with a lot of motorcycle dealers is that they don't know what customer service means.
 
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