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So I'm totally jazzed about the idea of owning a SS but, I have no experience riding motorcycles since I was a teenager on a dirt bike one summer. It seems to more of a roadster car than a cycle. What are your thoughts?
 

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So I'm totally jazzed about the idea of owning a SS but, I have no experience riding motorcycles since I was a teenager on a dirt bike one summer. It seems to more of a roadster car than a cycle. What are your thoughts?
Drive defensively. I don't think any mc experience is needed but watch out for everyone else.
 

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If you are going to ride with other motorcycle riders, I suggest you take the safety course. It will help you understand what they are thinking and doing.
 

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I would say what everyone else has said is good, the key is the scan. Keep your eyes out for what is in front of you, not just right in front of you but far enough out to be able to think & react.

I've been hit by a deer on a motorcycle before, and managed to stay on 2 wheels. I credit seeing it and knowing how long it was going to take to get there to being my saving grace. (And liberal amounts of luck.)
 

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The SS will be a great place to start. Just get used to blind spots and checking your periphery. Welcome to the open road!
 

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No need to worry, assuming you have driven a car/truck before.

Everything everyone has posted here applies to ALL vehicles, not just motorcycles so all of this advice is fantastic.

Having said that, make no mistake - the SS is a three wheeled car - not a three wheeled motorcycle (a la Spyder) regardless of how it fits descriptions in the law. Much of what makes the motorcycle experience unique from a riding perspective doesn't apply to the SS - no tipping over, no walking to reverse, no leaning, no gyroscopic physics to consider, no font brake/rear brake considerations, no twisted throttles, no "high" ride height.

Many of the things that make motorcycles unique from cars you won't find with the SS however some of the great ones are included - open cockpit, feeling of speed, very elemental, exposure to the elements, sounds and smells, low power to weight, etc.

I am glad Polaris is exploiting the "loophole" in the 3 wheels motorcycle law so that we can experience this SS awesomeness. Just bear in mind that it is more car than cycle.
 

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No need to worry, assuming you have driven a car/truck before.

Everything everyone has posted here applies to ALL vehicles, not just motorcycles so all of this advice is fantastic.

Having said that, make no mistake - the SS is a three wheeled car - not a three wheeled motorcycle (a la Spyder) regardless of how it fits descriptions in the law. Much of what makes the motorcycle experience unique from a riding perspective doesn't apply to the SS - no tipping over, no walking to reverse, no leaning, no gyroscopic physics to consider, no font brake/rear brake considerations, no twisted throttles, no "high" ride height.

Many of the things that make motorcycles unique from cars you won't find with the SS however some of the great ones are included - open cockpit, feeling of speed, very elemental, exposure to the elements, sounds and smells, low power to weight, etc.

I am glad Polaris is exploiting the "loophole" in the 3 wheels motorcycle law so that we can experience this SS awesomeness. Just bear in mind that it is more car than cycle.
...and I'll miss some of that 2-wheel 'thrill' but I won't miss sweating a patch of sand or loose gravel, having big trucks try to blow me off the road in a thunderstorm, etc. Guess I am getting old.....oh well guess it happens to all of us.
 

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You should always drive defensively... but you'll notice it is the advice motorcycle riders always drive home first. That's life experience driving that and it can't be emphasized enough to listen to it. Slingshot is somewhere in the middle, for safety, between motorcycles and cars. You experience a lot on a bike that isn't nearly as common after riding a few years... and a lot of those less pleasant experiences will likely translate to Slingshot experiences as well.

See that car to your left? He probably doesn't see you and is about to swap lanes.
See that car coming up behind you as you are stopped at the light? He is probably miscalculating his stopping distance and going to hit you pretty hard from behind.
See that guy waiting to make a right and enter traffic? He probably doesn't see you either and will NOT leave you room to stop.
See the 18 wheeler in front of you that is making you feel a bit safer? His tire is getting ready to blow and likely going to slam into your windshield at 60 miles an hour.

Wouldn't hurt to take a safety course even though this is presumably safer than a motorcycle to ride. Barring that, with the small footprint of the Slingshot, at a minimum I would assume every vehicle on the road does not know I am there. To that affect, exhaust will be the first thing I mod on mine :)
 

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All good infor. Just drive defensively, be un-impared, and always think ahead of what could happend and what you could do to avoid it. Enjoy you SS when you get it.
 

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Just an opinion. I assume the operation will be more like a car with a standard transmission. From what I've seen, it'll handle quite well for having only one wheel in the rear. However, to my understanding the laws dictate that a motorcycle license is required to operate one. Well, until you get nailed by the police anyway.
 

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However, to my understanding the laws dictate that a motorcycle license is required to operate one. Well, until you get nailed by the police anyway.
Hi Baron. This varies state by state. Some require a motorcycle endorsement and others don't. I'm in Washington state where there's an exemption for vehicles with seats, seat belts, and steering wheels. Helmets are required, but not a motorcycle license.
 

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That's the vibe I'm getting. For example, I am completely beside myself that people in Texas and Indiana are experiencing legality issues. But, people from Illinois are riding off into the sunset. Typically, Illinois and specifically Cook County have some pretty backwards thinking. I'm sure some politician's kid will want a slingshot. They'll figure out they didn't tax enough on them. And, come up with some bogus ban. That is until the politician's buddy makes a class for $500 where upon completion the state will deem you a safe slingshot operator and you'll be able to use it again lol.
 

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That's the vibe I'm getting. For example, I am completely beside myself that people in Texas and Indiana are experiencing legality issues. But, people from Illinois are riding off into the sunset. Typically, Illinois and specifically Cook County have some pretty backwards thinking. I'm sure some politician's kid will want a slingshot. They'll figure out they didn't tax enough on them. And, come up with some bogus ban. That is until the politician's buddy makes a class for $500 where upon completion the state will deem you a safe slingshot operator and you'll be able to use it again lol.
Well thats just it, its all about the money, about the money, no......
er, nevermind...
:)
 
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