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Discussion Starter #1
I haven't seen this discussed on here but I think it should be.

If the Slingshot does indeed get classified as a motorcycle since it has 3 wheels it should be noted that a motorcycle endorsement will be needed to legally operate it on the roads. In most states this will require a motorcycle training class mainly the MSF BRC course for most states. This is something those on this forum without endorsements should look into if they are interested in purchasing a Slingshot.
 

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Agreed! I'm wondering what motorcycle training classes are going to do when people start showing up to the classes in a Slingshot? What do Spyder owners do? Do they take their Spyders, borrow a motorcycle or use a class that provides motorcycles?
 

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Agree but everyone should be aware of their state's laws.

In Virginia there is a separate test for 3 wheelers and a seperate license endorsement. You can be 3 wheel "motorcycle" endorsed and not be 2 wheel endorsed.
 

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I'm not sure on this. Can Am is a motorcycle so that makes sense and yes you take the test on the Can Am like you take the car test in the car you'll be driving :D unless your in one of those big cities who just shove people though the system in the same car

I'm not sure what Trex Morgan and Slingshot would need.

here's one thing as well https://www.facebook.com/ElioMotors/posts/476020285796182 Elio doesn't need a motorcycle license in most states and hey're working on the few remaining holdouts. so maybe the more car like nature of the slingshot would fall under this as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't know about other states but I know in Florida when you take the MSF BRC course you use a bike that your school of choice provides. This is mainly due to the fact that in Florida you can't get an endorsement without first taking the MSF BRC course. The class is also designed for those who have never swung a leg over a motorcycle before so the class is very oriented on just starting out on using the levers and throttle to get the bike moving slowly at first. Now if I had to do the BRC course in a Slingshot I can definitely say I would fail the test just from the size of the vehicle it would make some of the tests near impossible to do, like the double u-turn in the tiny box, or the quick evasive lane change in a space that the Slingshot would barely fit.
 

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Elio has changed the laws IF 3 wheel vehicles have a roof and roll over protection. Louisiana just changed their law.

It is a good thing, in my opinion, that the Slingshot is considered a motorcycle. Slingshots are not required to have a lot of costly equipment which make them heavier and more expensive. Much like motorcycles, the thrill of ownership comes from the connection with your surroundings which gets diluted in a car with all the regulations.

Of course the trade off is the lack of safety which is a risk I think I should be able to take if I want to. It should be my choice IMHO.

Perhaps safety can be a differentiator for other manufacturers who follow Polaris' lead... assuming the Slingshot is popular.
 

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Hmmm . . . the Slingshot really wouldn't have any business being on a conventional motorcycle rider's safety course. It certainly will be interesting to see how States handle this. Are we 100% sure that the Slingshot is going to be designated as a motorcycle?
 

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Hmmm . . . the Slingshot really wouldn't have any business being on a conventional motorcycle rider's safety course. It certainly will be interesting to see how States handle this. Are we 100% sure that the Slingshot is going to be designated as a motorcycle?
100% sure.

The only way it can be sold in the US without airbags and safety features is:
1. It is classified as a motorcycle
2. It is a "kit car" where the drivetrain is sold separately from the vehicle and installed

If they were going to make it a kit car then there is no reason to have one rear wheel, so option 1 is the best way to go.

Polaris gets around a lot of development headaches (and costs) by going 3 wheels.
 

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looks like here in Ohio. If you do not have a Motorcycle endorsement. You will need to get a 3 wheeled endorsement by testing like any other endorsement. If you have a motorcycle endorsement, you will already be considered qualified to operate a 3 wheeled motorcycle and can have the endorsement added to your license.
But I will call and verify this so there's no surprises.

http://www.bmv.ohio.gov/faq_three_wheel.stm
 

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In California, a motorcycle endorsement is NOT required for a 3-wheel vehicle, which is by Vehicle Code definition a motorcycle. This includes sidecar, conventional trike, Spyder, meter maid buggy, Corbin Sparrow, etc., etc. See the DMV's Motorcycle Handbook (PDF), page 3.

This will vary by state. I suspect Polaris has already done the research and compiled a convenient list.
 

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From PA Dept of Transportation:

MOTORCYCLE
DEFINITION: A motor vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, or designed to travel on two wheels in contact with the ground which is modified by the addition of two stabilizing wheels on the rear of the motor vehicle.
CRITERIA:
1. Inspection required.
2. Motorcycle plate issued.
3. Individuals who meet the following criteria are able to choose whether to wear a motorcycle
helmet:
 The operator or any occupant of a 3-wheeled motorcycle equipped with an enclosed cab.
 A person 21 years of age or older who has been licensed to operate a motorcycle for at
least two years.
 A person 21 years of age or older who has completed a motorcycle rider safety course
approved by PennDOT or the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.
 The passenger of a person who is exempt, if the passenger is 21 years of age or older.
4. Eye protection required.
5. Annual registration fee is $18.
6. Class M (motorcycle) required on driver’s license.
7. Class M or a Class M with a “9” restriction required on driver’s license. NOTE: A “9”
restriction prohibits the driver from operating a 2-wheeled motorcycle.
NOTE: Side-cars are not titled or registered in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
 

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A Bit More from Penndot About Licensing:

Do I need a Class M (motorcycle) license to operate a motorcycle with more than 2
wheels?

Maybe. If the 3-wheeled motorcycle has an enclosed cab, you do not need a Class M
(motorcycle) license or motorcycle learner’s permit. However, if the 3-wheeled motorcycle
does not have an enclosed cab, you are required to have a Class M (motorcycle) license
or motorcycle learner’s permit. If you are interested in obtaining a license to operate a
motorcycle with more than 2 wheels, you can apply for a motorcycle learner’s permit on a
DL-5 form. After successful completion of the licensing exam, you will be issued a motorcycle
license with the “9” restriction indicating that you are prohibited from operating a 2-wheeled
motorcycle.
 

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My insurance asked me if i had taken a safety riders course when I bought my Spyder RTS, they will give you another discount on insurance if you have.
 

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The MSF BRC course covers you for 2 and 3 wheel motorcycles, trikes and reverse trikes. You can take a 3 wheel only "trike course" and be licensed for 3 wheel taken on your trike, reverse trike. I am sure it will fall into this course.
 

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The MSF BRC course covers you for 2 and 3 wheel motorcycles, trikes and reverse trikes. You can take a 3 wheel only "trike course" and be licensed for 3 wheel taken on your trike, reverse trike. I am sure it will fall into this course.
It still varies state to state so just make sure you state the state you are in. ;)
 

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It still varies state to state so just make sure you state the state you are in. ;)
Yep. Iowa is pretty straight forward if you take the MSF BRC, which I did. Pass the BRC and go take the IDOT knowledge test and you're done.

Polaris has a nice drop down in their FAQ on this subject: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/slingshot/faqs
 

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No motorcycle endorsement needed in Washington state. Law currently exempts 3 wheel vehicles with seats, seat belts, and steering wheels. Another selling feature -- as if I needed another!
 

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I'm disabled and live in Missouri. DMV told me I could take the test in the Slingshot and then would be endorsed to ride only the Slingshot.

That test is going to fun. NOT.
 

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HoppR - Where are you at ? I am in KC.
As I stated in another thread, I think it will be almost impossible to pass the driving test in a slingshot. You will never be able to see the cones in the slalom course or the lane change. This is going to get interesting.
 
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