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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been waiting to install my Hahn Turbo kit until my swing-arm gets repaired. I also wanted to install my Radio and Boost gauge into the cubby area where the factory radio normally installs, but I've been concerned about the heat coming from the engine compartment into the uninsulated cubby area. Awhile back, I designed a radio mounting plate for my round marine radio and also equipped with a little storage hole to hold glasses, candy bar, etc, during a ride. I'm now redesigning the mounting plate, eliminating the storage hole so I can install my boost gauge. My radio says it should be protected from heat sources, so I watched the Cycle Springs install video for their no-longer-on-the market heatwall -
and decided to make my own. The last couple of weeks, I've had my Slingshot torn apart and I've basically spent an hour or two per day trying to figure out how to make the heatwall and several more hours per day trying to make a hopefully easy-to-understand how-to.
I have attached 4 PDF files, one covering the overall process of disassembling the dash and cutting a piece of sheet metal to serve as the heatwall, with the other 3 PDF files being printable templates allowing the recreation of a full-size template to transfer the dimensions onto a piece of sheet metal.

My Thanks to @WI_Hedgehog for converting my chicken scratch drawings into clean PDF files that make it a lot easier to create the full-size template. He also created a CAD file (DXF) of the template which I can email to those interested as I couldn't get it uploaded to the site. Just PM me with your email if you want a copy of the DXF file. See ZIP file in @WI_Hedgehog's post below.

Materials list - A printed version of the InsulatingTheCubbyArea.pdf how-to. Follow the directions for printing and reassembling the 3 template sheets in the how-to.
An 8" x 24" sheet of thin aluminum or sheet metal and some black paint.
Aluminum tape.
Some self-stick insulation. I got mine on EBay, about 6-8 mm thick. 6 sf should be more than enough.
Electrical tape.
Cable ties

Tools list -
Typical Slingshot tools (T40 & T25 drivers, 7 & 8 mm Hex keys and a 10 mm socket/ratchet are the main tools that come to mind).
Sabersaw w/a metal-cutting blade or metal cutting snips.
Utility knife.
General purpose shears for cutting aluminum tape and the self-stick insulation.

Hope this helps somebody.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I still want more heat, or just a dam heater.
If we had some type of split-tonneau cover where we could leave the passenger seat area covered while having just the driver's area open, some heat would get trapped in the passenger area and a small heater might help. Unfortunately, all of the 12V heaters I've seen would seem to be under-powered as far as heating a semi-enclosed cockpit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
CAD file (DXF) of the template. It was a pleasure working with @BKL, he put a lot of effort into making his templates "smart." (It's all him, I was just the "line monkey." :writing: )
I'd forgotten that the original CAD file was zipped so it would be up-loadable. Thanks for posting it for me and for efforts.

I just reassembled my dash and am planning on a test drive once my back stops hurting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cheap heating blankets work super good and can easily be stored in the Slingshot.
I'd be afraid to use something like that as the driver. I'd be afraid it would encumber shifting/braking. Should be good for a passenger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
UPDATE - I found a possible small air leak at the center section of the Heatwall. See the attached PDF file for suggested fixes.

I've also been wondering if the insulation over the bigger opening in the cubby area where the wires come into the cubby area might get damaged over time by the flexing wires. A possible solution here would be to use a small piece of sheet metal to cover most of the bigger opening, secured by some aluminum tape and with a grommet or otherwise padded opening for the wiring to pas thru into the cubby area and then covered with self-stick insulation. The piece of sheet metal only needs to be large enough to overlap the sides on the bigger opening to provide sufficient strength and support so that the insulation covering the bigger opening doesn't get damaged by the wiring.

If I feel these changes are needed, I will incorporate them into the how-to. Until such changes are made, just keep these in mind and if you feel they are necessary, use them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I still want more heat, or just a dam heater.
Search EBay for "cab Heater". Or, this might help -
Some folks installed vents in the outer footwell wall to draw in cooler air. Installing similar vents in the transmission tunnel might draw the warmed air from the transmission tunnel, especially once you've insulated the cubby area. May not bring in a lot of warm air, but the cost is relatively cheap.

Additional comment - I believe this will help some when temps are above the mid-50s, but I'm not sure there will be enough warmed air in the transmission tunnel when temps drop below that point. The outside air will probably be so cool that it simply may not get exposed to enough heat to warm up the incoming air to a useful temp. Riding in the Slingshot with the transmission tunnel uncovered there is a noticeable amount of heat coming out of the exposed holes in the tunnel, but probably not enough to heat an open cockpit. Before I blocked off and insulated the cubby area, I would sometimes remove the storage tray so I could stick my hands int he cubby area for a little warmth. I never actually compared the outside temp with the amount of heat coming out of the cubby area, but definitely noticed the available warmth dropped off as temps dropped and speeds increased.
The only truly functional solution to the lack of heat when temps get below the mid-50s or so is probably to use a heater connected to the engine's cooling system and that may face problems given the exposed nature of the Slingshot's cockpit. As I mentioned above, some type of tonneau cover to help insulate and stabilize the cockpit air will probably be needed to achieve any significant degree of heating as temps go down. Riding in the Slingshot with the transmission tunnel uncovered there is a noticeable amount of heat coming out of the exposed holes in the tunnel, but probably not enough to heat an open cockpit. Before I insulated
 

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