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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Like many of the early-buyers, most of my postings are scattered throughout the forum under the appropriate thread topics. (Not saying the conversation itself is appropriate, but at least it's vaguely on-topic.) As the membership grew and thread topics were duplicated many times over some of the information has gotten lost and the wheel re-invented, sometimes better than before, sometimes a duplication of effort, and sometimes...well...

This thread has been created in an effort to make your life easier (please see the disclaimer).


INDEX
Routes - Get there your way!
Brake Pads - Brembo on the cheap (some grinding required) (in process)
Coilovers - Shockingly easy "shocks" install (in process)
(more to come)


The Tiny Print: Any posts deemed to not benefit the membership will be removed without warning. You can Private Message me and complain about it all you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Coilovers

I didn't have a chance to finish this, but it answers questions that keep popping up so here's the first section on Coilovers:

In this case, "coilover" is short for "coil spring over a shock absorber." While it may also describe something done after a night of binge drinking, this section will discuss improving your life outside the bathroom.

The Slingshot's "stock" or factory supplied suspension is pretty decent considering it is a light vehicle at a reasonable price. It has what marketing departments call a "sporty ride," but in reality that means "harsh." It not bad for a jaunt around the city, but its shortcomings become apparent when driving on a bumpy highway for a few hours.

What a good set of adjustable coilovers will do is allow you to adjust the damping and ride height, plus thin your wallet out a bit making the seat more comfortable. What they won't do is give you a perfect ride, the Slingshot is too light for that and some compromise in handling has to be made, which is what the stock shocks do quite well. The stocks are pretty tight, making the steering very sharp and predictable if the alignment is properly adjusted. The softer the ride, the more "mushy" the steering feels, where the Slingshot can wallow about--it's kind of like spaghetti noodles, when dry they're straight and firm, when cooked they're soft and all over the place. Adjustable coilovers allow you find that "sweet spot" where you're most happy with the handling, and adjust it by hand without tools in just a few minutes if you want a change.

This video by Slingking shows what I'm describing:

Coilovers will unload your wallet, so it's important to get something that performs well and lasts a long time, otherwise you'll be less than fully satisfied with the ride and probably fairly pissed off when you have to pay for replacements after they wear out. I chose JRi 2-way adjustables from Alpha Powersports. Unlike other coilovers, JRi are rebuildable, so if you put tons of miles on them and wear them out they can be rebuilt instead of replaced, saving you money. Alpha worked with JRi in designing a system specifically for the Slingshot so you get the best ride within the limits of what coilovers can do, putting the biggest smile on your face and not leaving you wishing you'd spent a bit more money to get the awesome ride someone else has. They're easy to install and adjust, which you'll come to appreciate if you're someone who's never done this before. Finally, all that marketing glop other vendors feed you in an effort to get you to buy their upgraded, top-end shocks with metal bushings instead of plastic/rubber, better valving and foam reduction, and all that other stuff--that functionality comes standard on these JRi's, so you shouldn't be missing anything the other manufacturers consider "special features." For the record they're monotube gas shocks with 60 clicks of damping adjustment, which you'll learn after you install them it was money well-spent.

The JRi double-adjustable shocks allow you to set the "ride height" of the Slingshot, which is the clearance between the frame and the pavement when on flat pavement. Stock is 5-1/2", you can go up or down. Raising the ride height gives more clearance at the expense of handling, so if you're scraping the front cowling on gas station entrances or your driveway apron, this should help. Lowering the Slingshot reduces the turbulence under the vehicle, which is what causes a stock ride height to be a little floaty over 50 MPH; lowering it makes it feel more "planted" and stable. You'll also wipe out small critters who cross the road at an inopportune time, like squirrels, for instance. (Darn tree rats.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Routes

Part of the joy of owning a Slingshot is pre-planned trips. You want to take a set route, but your Google Map only allows a starting point and ending destination, and pretty much tells you how to get there. Yes, you can fat-finger the course and change the route, but if you make a stop and upset the phone it re-routes you the way it wants to go. Persnickety thing.

Not saying this is the best way to do it, but it works.

Google Maps ( https: // www.google.com / maps )

I put the starting and ending locations in the map on a PC, along with any waypoints (add waypoint). (It can be done from a phone, but it's harder due to the small screen.) Look at the route and change it as necessary by clicking on the route, then dragging it where you want to go. In theory, this can be sent to your phone, in practice this never worked for me.

Here's the default route from Milwaukee to Muskegon:
map_00.png
(it's taking the cross-lake ferry)

Create your custom route, when you're done in the left pane select "via" and the suggestion it lists.
map_01.png

The "via" will change to a turn-by-turn list of waypoints. Here's a custom map from the same starting to ending points, now along the shoreline and upper peninsula:
map_02.png

Share the map (triangle-like thing).
map_03.png


Copy the link and e-mail it to yourself.
map_04.png

Open e-mail on your phone
Screenshot_20160916-161805.png

and COPY the link.
Screenshot_20160916-162111.png
Special Note (for special people): If you click the link or select Open In Browser it will It will open in Maps and suggest a new route. Do not do this. It does not work.

Open Chrome Web Brower (not maps),
map-a.png
tap the address bar, tap and hold so Paste pops up,
map-c.png
paste in the link. That will allow multi-point set-route navigation. If the map in the browser gets wiped out, just copy the link from e-mail back into the browser.
Screenshot_20160916-162159.png

All well and fine there, but remember to create a route back home also!


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That's an awesome little Route...you should take US23 down the Huron route sometime. I used to live out there and taking 23 north up through the lower part of the UP was really a lot of fun. Gorgeous area!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
IMG_20160925_174942-1024.jpg IMG_20160925_175029-1024.jpg
The beach is interesting, only the outer edge is sand, everything under the water is like a smooth lava-rock, but very hard. You literally walk from sand onto a solid stone bottom, not little stones but one large, flat, continuous stone surface.

When the camera started getting hit is when the rain was so hard the Slingshot couldn't deflect it, traffic hit the brakes, and everything slowed to about 25MPH. It was wet...but the rest of the day was good and we had fun.

Tell Squirrel I see some dust on those rims and that shit don't fly with me. :)
Washed. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Squirrel blew a code in Illinois and it was a battle to figure out the cause. Sure, we got the MIL code, but looking it up what it meant didn't go as well as it could have. I've since created a portable PDF of the codes for phones, about 7MB in size. If you're interested, PM me with the subject MILF Dating uh, MIL Codes and your e-mail address.


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Smack that little tag down there too, it encourages people to post more good stuff!...↓↓↓
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Also, sorry about the lack of conclusion on the coilover install, there's been a host o' trouble in the front end of the machine they were installed on, and until we get it sorted the install video is on hold== I would not want to show what I did and have it go badly for others without first being able to say, "DON'T DO THIS." The install was ruled as "good" by several experienced mechanics, and the problems unrelated, but I feel more testing is needed to make sure everything is solid. Thanks for your patience.

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Patience. She thinks she's dog-ugly. Guess it depends on the dog...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Other than when the whole front cowl dropped. most of the bolts have stayed in place, until now. Almost lost one off the intake manifold, another had worked its way loose and was starting to back itself out. Pulled all five and thread-locked 'em.

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You can probably figure out which is going to be a problem.

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This one too.

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The cam cover makes for a makeshift workbench. I put down a damp microfiber cloth so nothing slides, socket set so dropped tools won't ding the Alpha coil cover plate (plus it's handy), paper towel to catch any threadlock drips (stuff eats clear coat like nuthin'), 10mm 1/4" drive socket on a nut driver to spin the nuts in and out quickly, stumpy 3/8" ratchet, 4-1/2" extensions, and 10mm socket to tighten them down.

The bolt holes in the plastic intake manifold are sleeved, so the bolts can be torqued until snug, plus a little. (Remember to use a stubby ratchet, don't crank them down and strip the threads out of the engine block). Afterwards I took the damp cloth and wiped the engine down; removing the dust.
 
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