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If thinking about replacing stock headlights, please consider the job was done right, but it's a bad install.

Aftermarket bulbs that don't match OEM bulbs produce light differently, and project differently, which can easily cause glare and unexpectedly blind oncoming traffic. I found this out when one aftermarket HID bulb sat slightly differently than the other and caused insane glare. The illumination was unbelievably better, but the bulb didn't match the mount well enough to be adjusted down as to work properly. I removed the properly mounted bulb, diagnosed the problem, and figured out a different mounting procedure that was more reliable.

LEDs are even harder to work with because instead of a horizontal, thin filiment there are two rectangular LEDs and light transmission is very different. OEM LED housings are way different than the ones on the Slingshot, so the halogen housings can't possibly work as well as LED housings and there's going to be compromise that requires careful evaluation.

The reality is every step of the retrofit should be considered "fail" until proven to work properly. Unless everything works properly (not just "works") the system doesn't "pass," no matter who sold you what. If the installer isn't an expert they should consider having the work inspected by an expert to be sure it's right and works properly and reliably.
 

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In simple terms, the halogen lamp (the bulb) has a metal mount with a flange (a round lip), the top of the flange has a round cutout, the bottom a rectangular, and the fit to the lamp holder (where the bulb is stuck into) is very precise. This is so the filament is positioned exactly correctly, left-right, up-down, at the right depth, and even right-side up. The filament runs left-to-right (horizontal) and emits light along the length of the filament (cylindrically).

Aftermarket HID lamps have a plastic mount with a not-so-precise fit, so there is some slop when mounting. There is no filament, rather a metal-gas that is sparked into conducting, then glows much the way a florescent tube does, although much brighter. The chamber is forward facing (rear-to-front) instead of side-to-side (left-to-right), so it's kind of like an elongated plasma balloon that points forward (somewhat cylindrical, and turned 90° from a halogen filament). The light source is not only a different shape, but the bulb may not be mounted in the exact right position.

Aftermarket LED bulbs generally have two Light Emitting Diodes, one on each side of a post, much different from any OEM LED headlight design. As you can guess, this configuration is a lot different from a round filament, and the location of the LEDs on a "fat" post cannot match the location of the thin filament. The emission pattern is like a lighthouse. Unlike halogen (hot wire filament) and HID (really hot xenon gas), LEDs are electrical components and must be kept cool so they don't burn out, either by a large heatsink and cooling fins (generally requiring unrestricted air flow--ditch the waterproof boot), or a micro fan on the more powerful LED units (no boot and keep it clean & dry so the fan keeps running).

This is all important when one realizes the very tiny size of the fixture compared with old-fashioned (or even new) car headlights. These fixtures are very compact, and the reflector and lens are made very precise to accurately focus the light where you need it without blinding oncoming traffic. Any time the thin filament light source is changed, even the filament orientation, the light path is also changed, and that original, intended path is very defined: most of the light is focused on the road, some to the sides, and just a little is used to light up street signs and provide a broader view, but not so much as to blind oncoming traffic. It's all to provide the driver with the most visibility possible without endangering the driver and others, in many different driving conditions.

One additional thought is ballasts produce a fair amount of heat and a lot of voltage in a very compact area. A failure resulting in fire under the hood of a Slingshot may cause a lot of damage in a very short time.
 

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In simple terms, the halogen lamp (the bulb) has a metal mount with a flange (a round lip), the top of the flange has a round cutout, the bottom a rectangular, and the fit to the lamp holder (where the bulb is stuck into) is very precise. This is so the filament is positioned exactly correctly, left-right, up-down, at the right depth, and even right-side up. The filament runs left-to-right (horizontal) and emits light along the length of the filament (cylindrically).

Aftermarket HID lamps have a plastic mount with a not-so-precise fit, so there is some slop when mounting. There is no filament, rather a metal-gas that is sparked into conducting, then glows much the way a florescent tube does, although much brighter. The chamber is forward facing (rear-to-front) instead of side-to-side (left-to-right), so it's kind of like an elongated plasma balloon that points forward (somewhat cylindrical, and turned 90° from a halogen filament). The light source is not only a different shape, but the bulb may not be mounted in the exact right position.

Aftermarket LED bulbs generally have two Light Emitting Diodes, one on each side of a post. As you can guess, this configuration is a lot different from a round filament, and the location of the LEDs on a "fat" post cannot match the location of the thin filament. The emission pattern is like a lighthouse. Unlike halogen (hot wire filament) and HID (really hot xenon gas), LEDs are electrical components and must be kept cool so they don't burn out, either by a large heatsink and cooling fins (generally requiring unrestricted air flow--ditch the waterproof boot), or a micro fan on the more powerful LED units (no boot and keep it clean & dry so the fan keeps running).

This is all important when one realizes the very tiny size of the fixture compared with old-fashioned (or even new) car headlights. These fixtures are very compact, and the reflector and lens are made very precise to accurately focus the light where you need it without blinding oncoming traffic. Any time the thin filament light source is changed, even the filament orientation, the light path is also changed, and that original, intended path is very defined. Most of the light is focused on the road, some to the sides, and just a little is used to light up street signs and provide a broader view, but not so much as to blind oncoming traffic. It's all to provide the driver with the most visibility possible without endangering the driver and others, in many different driving conditions.

One additional thought is ballasts produce a fair amount of heat and a lot of voltage in a very compact area. A failure resulting in fire under the hood of a Slingshot may cause a lot of damage in a very short time.
just yesterday I tried to install 2 "all in one" LED H9 lights (the center lights) to replace the yellowish stock halogens. Plug and play units with built in fan..installed them and I could not for the life of me figure out why one LED light looked different from the other. Both were glowing and inserted into the housing correctly, but the right one projected the light at an odd angle and looked weird while the other one looked fine. Your post explains why..thanks..sending them back to amazon and sticking with the stocks for now until I can find a pure white H9 halogen.
 

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@jaytizzl, that's exactly it, both mounted up properly, but one was a bit out of position. You put them in correctly, yet it was a bad install due to the product, not the installer.

Another odd thing is the more yellow the light the more we see, the more blue the light the brighter it looks, but the less we see. Tungsten bulbs are around 2700°K (a bit more toward orange), halogen about 3000°K (yellow), and the daylight is about 5000°K. HID light color varies based on voltage, and between 4500° and 5000°K works best, any higher and they move into the blue spectrum and produce less visible light (the narrow band is better or worse absorbed by different things, so appears more crisp due to shadows, but we actually see less overall). Since HID bulbs color-shift between 100-500 hours, what you see initially isn't the end result--they shift to less yellow and more blue, meaning they're more crisp after burn-in. With less expensive HIDs, a 4500°K rating seems best, since they tend to over-rate the ballasts and the lamps burn hotter than expected (cheaper ballasts = higher actual Kelvin than rating = more crisp / less light).
 

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@jaytizzl, that's exactly it, both mounted up properly, but one was a bit out of position. You put them in correctly, yet it was a bad install due to the product, not the installer.

Another odd thing is the more yellow the light the more we see, the more blue the light the brighter it looks, but the less we see. Tungsten bulbs are around 2700°K (a bit more toward orange), halogen about 3000°K (yellow), and the daylight is about 5000°K. HID light color varies based on voltage, and between 4500° and 5000°K works best, any higher and they move into the blue spectrum and produce less visible light (the narrow band is better or worse absorbed by different things, so appears more crisp due to shadows, but we actually see less overall). Since HID bulbs color-shift between 100-500 hours, what you see initially isn't the end result--they shift to less yellow and more blue, meaning they're more crisp after burn-in. With less expensive HIDs, a 4500°K rating seems best, since they tend to over-rate the ballasts and the lamps burn hotter than expected (cheaper ballasts = higher actual Kelvin than rating = more crisp / less light).
Thank you for that great explaination, I got a real education...
 

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In simple terms, the halogen lamp (the bulb) has a metal mount with a flange (a round lip), the top of the flange has a round cutout, the bottom a rectangular, and the fit to the lamp holder (where the bulb is stuck into) is very precise. This is so the filament is positioned exactly correctly, left-right, up-down, at the right depth, and even right-side up. The filament runs left-to-right (horizontal) and emits light along the length of the filament (cylindrically).

Aftermarket HID lamps have a plastic mount with a not-so-precise fit, so there is some slop when mounting. There is no filament, rather a metal-gas that is sparked into conducting, then glows much the way a florescent tube does, although much brighter. The chamber is forward facing (rear-to-front) instead of side-to-side (left-to-right), so it's kind of like an elongated plasma balloon that points forward (somewhat cylindrical, and turned 90° from a halogen filament). The light source is not only a different shape, but the bulb may not be mounted in the exact right position.

Aftermarket LED bulbs generally have two Light Emitting Diodes, one on each side of a post, much different from any OEM LED headlight design. As you can guess, this configuration is a lot different from a round filament, and the location of the LEDs on a "fat" post cannot match the location of the thin filament. The emission pattern is like a lighthouse. Unlike halogen (hot wire filament) and HID (really hot xenon gas), LEDs are electrical components and must be kept cool so they don't burn out, either by a large heatsink and cooling fins (generally requiring unrestricted air flow--ditch the waterproof boot), or a micro fan on the more powerful LED units (no boot and keep it clean & dry so the fan keeps running).

This is all important when one realizes the very tiny size of the fixture compared with old-fashioned (or even new) car headlights. These fixtures are very compact, and the reflector and lens are made very precise to accurately focus the light where you need it without blinding oncoming traffic. Any time the thin filament light source is changed, even the filament orientation, the light path is also changed, and that original, intended path is very defined: most of the light is focused on the road, some to the sides, and just a little is used to light up street signs and provide a broader view, but not so much as to blind oncoming traffic. It's all to provide the driver with the most visibility possible without endangering the driver and others, in many different driving conditions.

One additional thought is ballasts produce a fair amount of heat and a lot of voltage in a very compact area. A failure resulting in fire under the hood of a Slingshot may cause a lot of damage in a very short time.

Great explination Here^ Thanks

So I did a LED kit any dowsides or benefits? light is chrisp clean and pretty well focused in fact IMO better than the OEM. The company that sells these kits is top notch last kit I had from them I ran 3 years without a single issue and I'm expecting the same from these.



 

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I too would be interested in where you purchased the new lights @Ops1. Also another topic I read somewhere on this forum is where to get the female oem plugs, orange and blue, to install accessories so I wouldn't have to splice my wires. Any help on either topic would be appreciated.
 

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I can't understand when people talk about mods like this they don't tell us where to buy or the name


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because they dont want you to COPY them...they did research and i guess? are saying you should do the same? JMHO!..:)
 

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Is it too hard to say what bulb I guess we don't help each other if that's what your saying


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After seeing the LED headlight bulbs with the braided wire cooling straps, I was intrigued with the approach used to cooling them and searched for fan-less LED headlight bulbs and found these on eBay from factorydepot - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fanless-Sup...381233823915?var=&hash=item58c34e80ab&vxp=mtr. A two-pack sells for $90 w/free delivery. Interestingly, the same seller offers the same bulbs just for the Slingshot here - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Polaris-Sli...391186734415?var=&hash=item5b148bdd4f&vxp=mtr, but priced at $100/pair, delivered. Factorydepot was the only USA-based eBay vendor I found, with all of the other vendors being in China. While the China-based sellers offered lower prices, I prefer dealing with a USA-based seller based on the assumption that the USA-based dealer is using a source he/she has dealt with before rather than me taking a chance on buying what might be a factory defect item.
I'm thinking about ordering a set of the H9 bulbs for the center headlights.
After contacting the seller about the price difference for the Slingshot-specific LED sets, the seller told me he just hadn't change the price and they dropped $10, so I ordered both the inner and outer LED sets. I'll post an update once I get them installed.
I hope I don't have any problems as I tried an LED bulb in my SV650 single headlight, but had problem being able to properly adjust the headlight aim.
 

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Excellent Cameron. Where did you get the LED lights? From Mike? How many Lumen? I started looking into LED a lot more the past couple days. The jury is out on whether they are ready for prime time. How long before we see pics? I too want to run the dual outer lights as well. Do you have a list of Polaris parts you need? Cost? Did you use those existing extra plugs on the outside?

I'm holding out for Laser headlights.... ;) Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight.

http://www.audi.com/com/brand/en/vorsprung_durch_technik/content/2014/04/laser-high-beam.html

audi has them!!
 

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After seeing the LED headlight bulbs with the braided wire cooling straps, I was intrigued with the approach used to cooling them and searched for fan-less LED headlight bulbs and found these on eBay from factorydepot - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fanless-Sup...381233823915?var=&hash=item58c34e80ab&vxp=mtr. A two-pack sells for $90 w/free delivery. Interestingly, the same seller offers the same bulbs just for the Slingshot here - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Polaris-Sli...391186734415?var=&hash=item5b148bdd4f&vxp=mtr, but priced at $100/pair, delivered. Factorydepot was the only USA-based eBay vendor I found, with all of the other vendors being in China. While the China-based sellers offered lower prices, I prefer dealing with a USA-based seller based on the assumption that the USA-based dealer is using a source he/she has dealt with before rather than me taking a chance on buying what might be a factory defect item.
I'm thinking about ordering a set of the H9 bulbs for the center headlights.
After contacting the seller about the price difference for the Slingshot-specific LED sets, the seller told me he just hadn't change the price and they dropped $10, so I ordered both the inner and outer LED sets. I'll post an update once I get them installed.
I hope I don't have any problems as I tried an LED bulb in my SV650 single headlight, but had problem being able to properly adjust the headlight aim.
Thanks for the info BKL. Did you buy these? If so how did they work. Were they plug and play? I just ordered the center and outer.
 

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I'm hoping the LED headlight bulbs (I ordered both the Center and Outer sets) will be delivered Saturday.
 

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I'm hoping the LED headlight bulbs (I ordered both the Center and Outer sets) will be delivered Saturday.
Did you get yours today? I'll have mine this week plus the halo led's with a headlight bypass. Hope they're all worth it. Bunch of money!
 
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