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looking for options on drilled brake rotors.... I am only aware of cycle springs product. Does anyone have any other options for the ss?
 

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looking for options on drilled brake rotors.... I am only aware of cycle springs product. Does anyone have any other options for the ss?
What he said!!!

The SS has a standard bolt pattern, there must be options available off the shelf. Someone just needs to find a way to cross reference the specs. Somebody will figure it out and hopefully post his findings here. Preferably sooner, rather than later.
 

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Remember you get what you pay for.
CycleSprings only uses all high performance
Race proven rotors.
That are well known in the racing world.
If you are just looking for looks this is not your product.The hats are machines in the USA with Quality first and most important. Last we zinc coat the rotors to stop rust
Our first thought was that the rotors would be an off the shelf rotor that could be find but to our surprise no rotor exists.
We are working with the leading brake Manufacture to make sure the the balance doesn't change. This is the most important parts of the vehicles stopping.
To much in the front or to much in the rear will throw the whole balance of the vechicle off. This is why we have been working so hard on make sure the larger calipers and rotors are correctly balanced to the slingshot for maximum stopping power.
 

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I wouldn't put garbage on my ride but I'm not looking to go racing either. I just want good quality, good looking street parts.
 

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Exactly String I put a set of nice rotors on my Vet for $400. Can't believe there isn't a set out there for our slings for around $300
 

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ALL ABOUT BRAKES:
What you should know before spending big bucks


Brakes turn kinetic energy (motion) into thermal energy (heat). The heat is stored until it can be displaced by conduction, convection, and radiation (basically cooled by air). The larger the rotor the more heat it can store until the air has a chance to cool it off.

Drilling and slotting adversely affect braking ability: the holes/slots localize heat at the edges causing hot spots and warping, the reduced mass has less heat storage capacity. The holes do create turbulence and aide cooling, but the effect is negligible. On street vehicles it's all rice (money spent on looks, not performance).

Then why do race cars use them? They must be better, correct? Correct--for racing applications. Have you seen the under-car camera shooting the rotors? They get red hot every corner. Then they cool on every straight. A normal rotor would warp like a potato chip from that abuse, and the driver would have to brake sooner to avoid ruining the brakes--if they wanted usable brakes before the next corner--kind of helps, right? To give the driver an advantage, the rotors are made out of more expensive material (which resists warping but is harder to work with), and are much thicker (more mass=more heat absorption). At some point more thickness doesn't help as much as more diameter would, but more diameter leads to more weight and more rotational inertia--and rotational inertia is bad, bad, bad at race speeds. To compensate for the larger diameter the weight is reduced by drilling the rotors; this reduces the contact surface between the pads and rotor, and also weakens the rotor, not to mention greatly increases cost, but the performance advantage is worth it. On the street you will not see any advantage, only the disadvantages. It would be like replacing your entire dash with carbon fiber to save weight and increase performance, only to have to replace it when the sun has broken down the epoxy resin; that's incredible expense for no real gain, much like race brakes on a street car.

On to the cost: The factory brake system was designed for the application, and reducing production cost was a major consideration, as it is everywhere on the Slingshot. The early test units were highly engineered and rigorously tested to ensure traction and stability were as best as could be reasonably achieved for the weight and price point of the vehicle. It wasn't good enough. Being a "concept vehicle" some unknowns were discovered during a press run, investigated, and the engineering team was all over it like white on rice. They rectified the situation, and in the end a lot of money had been spent on that part of the vehicle.

Since many of the castings were already outsourced to China, the rotor and caliper assemblies were too. The Chinese already make most every rotor you'll find at AutoZone, O'Reilly, and other chains, this wasn't much different. New castings aren't that expensive to make, especially when labor rates are $12/day.

In my opinion, the quality is really good for the price Polaris is paying, which is next to nothing. For the replacement part cost, however, most all of us would consider them "junk." If you've torn them apart you'll probably be of the same opinion; any Ford/Chevy/Toyota system is way better quality. Nissan uses some really cheap parts in their vehicles, but even those are light years ahead in the quality department.

So why are SlingshotOnly (Cycle Springs) brakes so damn expensive? Out of all the Slingshot owners, a few push them to their limits in the mountain twistes and/or on the track. There's not a lot of dense air in the mountains, and there are a lot of curves. Still not a problem for the Slingshot, the brake system is so over-designed the pads don't heat up much under normal driving, and can handle most anything thrown at them. Until you factor in a turbocharger, and the driver racing downhill on mountains, friggin' crazy by normal accounts. Compensating for low-quality is sheer size, and the Chinese stuff does great until heat soak sets in. The turbo helps the driver add so much speed between curves the rotors don't have enough time to fully shed the heat and they start to fade, that same condition causing race car drivers to slow down and brake earlier into turns. And now you see how this all ties together, you're buying a full-blown racing brake system. @Noel Hughes didn't get a "good" system, or even a "great" system, he worked with people who make racing brake systems and went to a "holy balls this is f-ing awesome" system.

There you have it. Custom racing brake system. Now you know why it only fits larger wheels, not the base rims. Looks awesome and stands out from the crowd for a reason. No rice there.

big-brake-all.jpg
 

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My grandson is going to slot my rotors with a ball mill on an arc that will be directional. when they get done I'll post pictures. It may not help with braking but the cool factor will be nice.

Right now I'm doing a custom install on an air ride system.

LC
 

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My grandson is going to slot my rotors with a ball mill on an arc that will be directional. when they get done I'll post pictures. It may not help with braking but the cool factor will be nice.

Right now I'm doing a custom install on an air ride system.

LC
Look forward to seeing them!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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