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Discussion Starter #21
I guess if I was any other person and I was reading about this I would not address my angle Drive I would just keep driving it, but if it broke, when I put the new one on I would probably have this brace put on to it that's for sure
 

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I guess if I was any other person and I was reading about this I would not address my angle Drive I would just keep driving it, but if it broke, when I put the new one on I would probably have this brace put on to it that's for sure
I will make this request again, why don't you remove the bearing from the first pictured drive, several folks have reported that bad bearings have created heating issues of that area of the angle drive, thus the reason I am not ready to jump to conclusions..................? (Like I also previously stated, I have eaten crow before, but at least we will know if the bearing is the issue.)

And, we are addressing the possible issues of our angle drive, after extended trips with the Grasshopper I remove a cup holder and visually inspect the input shaft area of our angle drive, plus feel it for overheating, it just takes a couple of minutes.

For many of the folks that have owned their SlingShot for a while, (us since early 2015), we have witnessed many a case of jumping to conclusions and the introduction of products that cost a lot of money, but later proved to be of minimal use, to no use at all, in actually curing a problem. So please, don't get so uppity because we are not jumping at your brace, we are just wanting to make sure of the real problem first.

Bill
 

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That bracket looks like a great idea. I’ve seen a lot of bearings on rear ends fail and never break the case. They eat up gears, kill bearings, etc but usually not a broken case. Looking at the design of the angle drive there is a lot of stress in that area and not a lot casing to distribute that amount of stress so in theory the idea of bracing the front “neck” could help with strengthening the case.

There could be some flex in that area as well putting some torsional forces on the case it’s not meant to handle. I would think if your brace also attached to the frame to add some more regidity to the drive unit itself could help solve the issue. Any flexing or twisting in that area can also pre maturely wear bearings, causing over heating leading to stress cracks as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #24

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Discussion Starter #25
Then someone else on Facebook posted a video of a similar break , here is a few screenshots from the video
Screenshot_20181006-043532_Facebook.jpg
Screenshot_20181006-043522_Facebook.jpg
 

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Well, SCHWINGshot, I think that I have spent more time looking over our angle drive than in our entire ownership since you initiated these threads, (not a bad thing!! :) )

While talking about lubricant levels , even though I was certain about the fluid level in our angle drive, I decided to jack up the Grasshopper this morning and just check it again. It was OK, but during this inspection I noted where the bottom of the fill hole was in relation to the bottom of the input shaft housing, and there isn't much difference, where if the lubricant level was just a little low in the angle drive, it could be below the input shaft bearing, (maybe somebody else would like to confirm this for us?) This could account for the lack of fluid in your pictures, possibly?

Just FYI, when I changed the angle drive fluid, I initially filled it, drove for a while and then went back to recheck the level, where I have had to add additional fluid. I am thinking this could be a possible reason for that bearing to fail? In addition, when I refill the angle drive, I jack up the Grasshopper from the drivers side tilting the angle drive so I can get in additional fluid. (This is a practice I picked up from others way back in the beginning.)

Just sharing.................

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Here is another one that was posted on Facebook
Screenshot_20181006-171216_Facebook.jpg
 

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I know some have had problems but probably 99+ have not. No reason to create concern for us 99 percenters.
Reminds me of the swing arm, only 1% had their swingarms crack but 100% of the swingarms were recalled and everyone had them replaced because you just never know if you are next..

Also for those who check their angle drive to see if it is excessively hot, what would be your next step if it was excessively hot?
 

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Also for those who check their angle drive to see if it is excessively hot, what would be your next step if it was excessively hot?
First thing is that if a gearbox is operating correctly, I do not believe that there should be such stress put upon the input shaft and housing to create such a failure, but to answer your question;

If you mean by "excessively hot" being significantly warmer than the rest of the gearbox, I would be checking fluid level, if significantly low inspecting for leakage and repairing, otherwise refill and continue running it, of course, monitoring things closely. If the fluid was at/near normal level I would be removing/inspecting/replacing the input shaft bearing, (the only source of excessive heat in this area.) If way too hot to touch, I would very strongly be considering replacing the gearbox, aluminum does not take kindly to this type of abuse, then I would be disassembling the offending gear box just to see what makes it tick! :confused:

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Gary Mancuso Jr.
^^Click the Link^^


Video , for some reason it wouldn't let me post the video so here's a link to Facebook where the video is
 

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The housings are probably made from all the recycled beer cans we send to China. Just kidding. Really though, it would be interesting to find out of they do any penetrant testing, X-rays, or other non destructive tests before assembling them. Probably not since it's "only a motorcycle". Not like it flies or anything. Errr not supposed to fly anyway.
 

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The housings are probably made from all the recycled beer cans we send to China. Just kidding. Really though, it would be interesting to find out of they do any penetrant testing, X-rays, or other non destructive tests before assembling them. Probably not since it's "only a motorcycle". Not like it flies or anything. Errr not supposed to fly anyway.
We should be so lucky to have that high of quality material.

No die-penetrant as there's not supposed to be a seam there.

I'm guessing no other non-destructive tests given Polaris over-all importance of quality.

It could be an issue related to the way the material is flowed while casting the part, such as the manufacturer is trying to increase production to meet an economic goal and didn't realize the problem that was created until reports of part failure happen. It could also be a change in the brittleness of the material.

Since a bunch of us put turbochargers on plus added extra-fat rear tires it's probably not an inherent design issue or we'd be the first to blow those things up.
 

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Interesting stuff on this link:
http://www.slingshotforums.com/threads/inside-the-angle-drive-proper-belt-tension.13695/page-16
The author of this thread (LILB93) noted that if you were to fill the AD entirely it would hold 3.5 qts. He used 1.75 in the one he rebuilt. The last report I found from him he had run it several hundred miles and the temps, nor drag, never increased with the additional oil. Others have also increased the amount. Check out POSTS 93, 94, 99. 132, 137, 138,139, 140, 141, 173.

I believe I originally reported I had about 1 3/4 qts but with hindsight, its closer to
1.5 qt, perhaps a hair over. (This was on the '16.5. Current '18 has only 1 quart but when I change it again I plan on putting more in.)
 

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Well, SCHWINGshot, I think that I have spent more time looking over our angle drive than in our entire ownership since you initiated these threads, (not a bad thing!! :) )

While talking about lubricant levels , even though I was certain about the fluid level in our angle drive, I decided to jack up the Grasshopper this morning and just check it again. It was OK, but during this inspection I noted where the bottom of the fill hole was in relation to the bottom of the input shaft housing, and there isn't much difference, where if the lubricant level was just a little low in the angle drive, it could be below the input shaft bearing, (maybe somebody else would like to confirm this for us?) This could account for the lack of fluid in your pictures, possibly?

Just FYI, when I changed the angle drive fluid, I initially filled it, drove for a while and then went back to recheck the level, where I have had to add additional fluid. I am thinking this could be a possible reason for that bearing to fail? In addition, when I refill the angle drive, I jack up the Grasshopper from the drivers side tilting the angle drive so I can get in additional fluid. (This is a practice I picked up from others way back in the beginning.)

Just sharing.................

Bill
Regarding lubricant level: It would be quite normal for the correct fluid level of this type of device to be even below the shaft or the bearing. This is true for many differentials, for example. The reason for this is that as long as any part of the gear is immersed in the lubricant, it will throw the lubricant all over the inside of the housing, thereby lubricating the bearings. There is an excellent video by Gale Banks that was just put out to demonstrate this. Not sure if the link will work, but you can search for Jalopnik and "Watching Gear Oil Splash Through This Clear Differential Cover Is Deeply Satisfying" or https://jalopnik.com/watching-gear-oil-splash-through-this-clear-differentia-1829278489 . The video aims to demonstrate the importance of the differential cover shape in the internal movement of the lubricant. They sell a differently shaped cover for the F150.
 

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I find it interesting that none of these failures are like the one that I had. On mine, the saft where the ring gear resides, blew out the bearing on the input side of the drive. The pinion gear remained in place. My dealer stated that they haven't seen an angle drive failure, but I don't imagine there's a whole ton of these things in the PNW.
 

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Techkraut: interesting video. Not sure how to apply that to our AD's in that ours are elongated instead of basically round. I feel satisfied with putting a quart in, maybe a bit more if I can.

I wonder if perhaps 75-90 might offer better lubrication and better cooling? Not going that route, particularly with the warranty in effect, but out of curiosity, has anyone seen any tests of gear oils similar to the oil splash test shown above?
 

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The bracket idea is cool but I would be concerned about why it failed in the first place. Especially twice on the same machine. I can't believe that you got unlucky twice in a row. There must be a reason why it happened other than a bad casting/assembly. Just a thought...


Our personal Turbo'd Sling has over 23k miles with no angle drive problems. There are several 500hp V8's running around with no issues yet too.
Non of our customers have had failures or major issues (we've been changing fluid once a year on everyone's) and have been running 75w-140 weight. I've seen some weepage at the front seal on some Slings but nothing to get concerned about. Our personal Sling is running straight Amsoil 160w just to see how it works. So far not much different than the 75-140.
 
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