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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We have been doing some testing to these spark plugs and we are loving them. A little smoother idle and over all runs better.

-We hand gap the spark plugs, hand file, diamond stone finish and put anti-seize on them, making them "Plug & Play" ready to install with no hot spots for detonation. The factory spark plug is a heat range of a 5, these are a 6. Basically they make more safe horsepower. With us shooting for about 25% horsepower gain with no boost, these will be needed, and boosted SS should already have these installed.

4 NGK Iridium Spark Plugs gapped, hand filed and diamond stone finish, anti-seize all ready for Plug & Play install
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Sale Price $55 plus shipping (shipping is $6.80 from USPS)
-Shipped for free with any other purchase-
-You will need to call, pm or text us as these are not on our website yet-

I personally have been doing these tricks to my own spark plugs since late 90's and always offer this option to all my customers. The more power you make the more these help. The 4 spark plugs at a local auto parts store sells for $39.96 plus tax.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The technical information your wanting to know right about now.. This is from the NGK website.

I Have Slightly Modified My Motor - Do I Need a Colder Spark Plug?

September 30, 2012

The term Heat Range refers to the speed with which a plug can transfer heat from the combustion chamber to the engine head. Whether the plug is to be installed in a boat, lawnmower or race car, it has been found the optimum combustion chamber temperature for gasoline engines is between 500°C–850°C. Within that range it is cool enough to avoid pre-ignition and plug tip overheating (which can cause engine damage), while still hot enough to burn off combustion deposits that cause fouling.










The spark plug design determines its ability to remove heat from the combustion chamber. The primary method used to do this is by altering the internal length of the core nose. In addition, the alloy compositions in the electrodes can be changed. This means you may not be able to visually tell a difference between heat ranges.

*When a spark plug is referred to as a “cold plug”, it is one that transfers heat rapidly from the firing tip into the engine head, keeping the firing tip cooler.

*A “hot plug” has a much slower rate of heat transfer, which keeps the firing tip hotter.

An unaltered engine will run within the optimum operating range straight from the manufacturer, but if you make modifications such as adding a turbo or supercharger, increasing compression, timing changes, use of alternate fuels, or sustained use of nitrous oxide, these can alter the plug tip temperature, necessitating a colder plug.


A good rule of thumb is, one Heat Range colder for every 75–100hp added.


In identical spark plug types, the difference from one fullHeat Range to the next is the ability to remove 70°C to 100°C from the combustion chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We are going to call everyone personally that ordered the Strut Bars and ask if they need anything else with the order.

@lokati Thanks for the info and they look like they will be shipping out to everyone Next Monday-Wednesday. We are going to update the thread. If you like, pm us and we can get everything taken care of so its on the invoice already.
 
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