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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just checked my clutch fluid reservoir, and noticed that the fluid (Dot-4 Brake Fluid) was badly discolored and much darker than what is in the brake cylinder reservoirs.. It appeared as if the rubber lid gasket had either broken down some or had dirt or manufacturing oils on it.

I removed the rubber gasket from the lid and cleaned it thoroughy, then unbolted the clutch fluid reservoir (8mm box wrench) and VERY CAREFULLY poured the fluid into a small container that I held below it in the engine compartment. I then wiped the inside of the container as best as I could, and then continued to drain out as much of the fluid as I could that was in the hose, until it all ran clear. Once I was confident that all of the contaminated fluid was removed, I bolted the reservoir back into place and refilled it with fresh Dot-4 brake fluid.

You guys and gals should probably take a minute to check yours too!
 

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What about bleeding it
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EDIT: I saw the brake fluid and mistakenly thought you were talking about the brake fluid reservoir, not the clutch fluid reservoir.

For the clutch fluid, the contaminants seem to float, so I'd just suck the fluid out with a bulb or Mighty Vac, use a lint-free paper towel to clean up the reservoir, and add new fluid. It'll mix with the old fluid and the Slingshot will have "mostly clean fluid." If one did drain the whole system, flush it, and put new fluid in, a month from now it would be "mostly clean fluid." The fluid softens paint, so I'd rather keep my "potential for disaster" minimized.

Regarding the brake system, which I mistakenly thought was the topic, the original post is below. Again, sorry for the confusion.
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Not a good choice for the anti-lock braking system, the valving is very sensitive to being plugged by contaminants (and air bubbles). Dump it, fill it, suck it, fill it, bump it, grind it.

punk.png


On a serious note, the proper way to remove contaminants is to use a Mighty Vac(tm) to suck the brake fluid out of the reservoir, add a small amount of clean fluid back in and see if anything gets stirred up, if so suck that out and repeat the process a few times until the fluid doesn't bring any debris back up. Fill the reservoir and use the Mighty Vac to bleed the front driver's side brake line (the shortest run) until clear, clean fluid comes out. Refill the reservoir and do the front passenger (the next longest run), refill and do the rear, refill and test the system.

It sounds like a lot of work, but isn't bad at all, and much easier (and far cheaper) than if a small piece of dirt clogs up a tiny valve or wreaks havoc with a caliper piston seal.

(And of course the Slingshot doesn't have a bump shifter, grinding gears is hard on the transmission, and the song lyrics only kind of match the text they're linked to, sorry @RABTECH.)
 

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OK. I have to ask. What has the video got to do with the brake fluid.
 

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OK. I have to ask. What has the video got to do with the brake fluid.
As a guy who's "up all night" wrenching his Slingshot, surely you can appreciate doing things "one more time" (like when the rear cover got left off during the shock install). Bleeding brake lines is that "dump it, fill it, pump it, suck it, fill it, work it, fill it" "one more time" process... Plus there's a lot of basic hand tools involved when working on a Slingshot, kind of like how Pentatonix doesn't use high-tech instruments, the music is all vocal, quite a talent, raw essence like the Slingshot. Quite a contrast to how some of us drive, especially those who know only one pedal. But then, we're refined, upstanding citizens here. Indubitably.

You did cause me to re-think the post and add how to get the system cleaned out, and of course one should eliminate the source of the problem as @TGreene223 did.
 

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Alright, are u talking Brake or Clutch?? I am having issues with my Clutch fluid being very dirty.Dealer did a flush, will see
 

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Clutch. same fluid, different system. the brake fluid on mine looks great, but it may have some small particles that keep the switches from working properly. The dirty clutch fluid looks almost as bad as the angle drive 75w140 that came out
 

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I just want to make sure I understand completely. The only fluid we can replace is what the reservoir holds? vac and fill over and over? :confused:
 

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Well....As my Grandma used to say when she couldn't believe something...I'll be dipped in dog shit. :meh:

So when we replace the clutch, what is the fill procedure?:bookworm: Fill the reservoir and pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pumppump pump pump pump pump?

Sounds like fun, but I'll bet it isn't...........
 

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From what I've heard, to replace clutch, PULL engine.. Ouch
 

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Heck of a deal for a clutch.. WOW
 

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Mine looked like it had water drops in it, plus the black stuff, cleaned it out with a paper towel and added new fluid. I did today after reading this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@Slingking it's really a very simple process to drain or pump (I drained) out the fluid.. Just get it gone, clean the reservoir and rubber seal, then refill with Dot-4 fluid. After refilling, you'll need to pump the clutch 15-20 times to eliminate all of the air in the lines until... Just pump it until the bubbles stop, then pump it another dozen times to be sure!

When you pump the clutch, the fluid (highly corrosive brake fluid) will splash as the bubbles come up, and even create a wave action and could splash once the bubbles have stopped.. Because of this, you want to be sure to have some type of barrier so that the fluid can't possibly get on any paint or pretty much anything that you don't want to risk being damaged. I used an old shop towel that I folded over lengthwise and then wrapped around the clutch reservoir to protect the area while I pumped the clutch pedal from a standing position so that I could watch the clutch reservoir for bubbles.

I hope this helps. :)

-Tim
 
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