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Just finished instaloling my Rockford Fosgate amp and found that the remote turn on from the head unit will not turn the amp on. It measures 12.6V not connected and drops to 1.8V connected. I temporarily wired a switch from B+ to the remote terminal. I did find a device to correct this - PAC TR-4 which is available on Amazon and other sources. Anyone else run into to this. Also anyone have PRP seats with SSV side pods and Rockford Fosgate RM1652B speakers? Just curious...
 

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I take it you are talking about the Polaris stock head unit?

If I were you, I would tie into that main radio harness and grab the ACC wire from the main 3 wire plug.

Never had a stock Polaris radio, so maybe there is a better way to do this....?
 

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I take it you are talking about the Polaris stock head unit?

If I were you, I would tie into that main radio harness and grab the ACC wire from the main 3 wire plug.

Never had a stock Polaris radio, so maybe there is a better way to do this....?
Yup, rip out the stock radio. Just sayin'......:angelic::banghead::D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, it is the stock Polaris head unit. I could tie into switch 12V+ from a number of locations, however, I would rather have the amp come on slightly after the radio boots to avoid the power on thump. The PAC TR-4 does 2 things; it provides a 1-2 sec delay and provides a 12V+ 2 amp output with as little as 0.6V input. Apparently some head units are not able to drive amp remote switches.
 

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get you a line level adapter that has a trigger wire that powers up when it senses audio.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Rabtech, I know you have a lot of experience with this sort of thing. I am receiving the PAC TR-4 today, so I will give it a try first and see if that resolves the issue.
 

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what do[es] this do and how do[es] it work
If an amplifier only has line-level inputs (relatively low voltage, 0.447V consumer or 1.736V pro, generally understood to be ~1V RMS 600-ohm impedance max.) and the head unit does not have line-level outputs (such as the Slingshot's stock Entertainment Center), the AX-ADCT2 converts the speaker voltage (somewhere between 7V and 11V max.) to line-level voltage (~1V).

Another way to think of it is a head unit that speakers can be hooked to directly has a built-in amplifier, and hooking that amplified output to the input of an external amplifier, which is expecting pre-amp voltages, will over-drive the external amplifier.


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Another function of a well-designed converter is it will try to defeat the factory system settings. In the Slingshot the speakers (technically called drivers) are pretty "tight," meaning they can only output a little bass. If you set the bass level to +5 or +6 it sounds "pretty good" when parked, and if you turn up the volume to the point the speakers (drivers) distort and then turn the volume back down and go for a drive, the sound isn't loud enough to hear. So the bass has to be cut (generally 0 to -2 depending on the source audio) to hear it on the road. Good head units will be set up so at low volumes the bass is strong, but at high volumes the bass is weak as to make the speakers "loud" and not over-drive them. If you hook that system to your 18" 6,000 Watt Butt-Thumper subwoofer, it'll sound great at low volume, but as you turn up the volume the bass is cut out by the head unit! You now got $4,000 invested into a system that sounds like a tweeter-beater!
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The converter will try to boost the bass back to where it belongs, but realize it's working with a "cut" signal, and my not have enough to work with, resulting in muddy output. (For $10 you can bet on muddy output.) This is why people who want really clean audio replace the stock head unit if it doesn't have clean line-out jacks.

Realize a Slingshot is an open-air vehicle, so it's going to be like moving your surround-sound system from inside your house to your yard, which isn't going to sound great. Now figure the wind is blowing fifty miles per hour, with gusts up to 85 MPH--not gonna like it.
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So the trick is to find a balance between price and performance that you're happy with.
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Hope this helps.
 
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